Artist Statement

Balancing Art, Work and Life!
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What is an Artist’s Statement & How Often Should It Be Updated?

July21

 by: Yasmeen Abdur-Rahman

An artist's statement is a statement of ideas and thoughts that describe your philosophy, vision, and passion towards your artistic creations.

Ponder over the following questions prior to writing your artist's statement:

  • Is your work whimsical, thought provoking, or edgy?
  • Does it portray a series of stories?
  • Whom or what has influenced you the most?
  • How is your work meaningful to you?

How do you begin to write your artists statement? You could begin by writing a quote that has inspired you and your work, or you could create a strong sentence that summarizes your philosophy about your life and how art has changed your views on life in general. You could also include what type of style and technique that motivates you the most while creating your art creation.

Some artists have writer's block when it comes to putting down their thoughts on paper. I would suggest that you start with words that best describe your art and inner thoughts then go back to edit them into definite statements. Most artists know and feel what they are trying to convey to their audience, however, writing it down becomes a huge task.

Personally, I believe your artist's statement should be written by yourself because of the personal touch you would be able to provide to it. No one knows better about your artistry other than yourself. Your audience will get a feel of what your inner thoughts are and how you find this passion to be a lifestyle and not a hobby.

Make sure you aren't using too many words that only artists would recognize. Express yourself while allowing your words to flow. You are expressing your passion; so don't feel pressured to become a renounced writer.

While being an artist is a rewarding career, unfortunately, there are people outside of this industry who would say it is a hobby. So, it is very important to express how you feel about your craft through your artist's statement. Writing a one-page statement would be sufficient in getting your statement across to your audience, but if it runs to a page two, that's fine. Clearly, it shows your audience that you are vividly and precisely getting your thoughts across.

Your artist's statement should be updated as your career inspires new direction and when there are profound events that have captured new inspirations in your creative vision. Your statement could be updated at the same pace similar to updating your résumé.

If you're still unsure how to get started, here are two excellent sites that have sample statements: www.mollygordon.com or www.naia-artists.org

Your artist's statement is a very important tool. Take a block of time out of your daily or weekly schedules to create the type of statement that will allow your audience to understand how you began your journey.

Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/business_and_finance/article_707.shtml

About The Author
Yasmeen Abdur-Rahman, Virtual Assistant & Lifestyle Entrepreneur Coach, is the owner of a home-based business called 'The Brownstone Workshop.' If you need your artist support materials (ASMs) professionally created and updated along with other administrative, ad hoc services, or lifestyle coaching, call on Yasmeen at (919) 319-6271, via e-mail yasmeen033@aol.com or via website: http://www.thebrownstoneworkshop.bigstep.com

Want to Become a Professional Visual Artist? Here are the 8 Rules You Need to Live By

July21
Author: Eric Hines
Being an artist for many years, owning an art dealer business representing multiple artists in Los Angeles, and being employed by the world's largest fine art instruction school have enlightened me on the finer points of what an amateur artist must do if they desire to make a living as a professional artist.

The following rules are addressed to becoming a professional fine artist working in the medium of paint. However these tips can really be applied to any medium of art, whether it be painting, poetry, or music.

It is my sincere wish that these pointers aid in your journey as a working artist!

Rule1: Know the Underlying Basics and Fundamentals of Your Craft.

For many many years I "played" the guitar and bass without having a clue how to read notes, scales, modes, keys, etc. After learning music theory my music was much better and I was far more productive.

Before I understood the fundamentals of music I had an excuse ready when I couldn't make a song go right, I was too tired, I was having a bad day, or not in the mood.

As a result since I had no clue WHY I did what I did when creating music I could never reach that state of being cause over my music, let alone professional in anyway.

Information, knowledge, data, has been, and unless the world turns inside out in the future, will always be power. You cannot only rely on your natural ability, you have to know the WHY (all the basics and fundamentals) behind the scenes of your art.

Take art lessons. If you are of the opinion that your skills are past this stage then you need to find a good mentor.

Rule 2: You Will Learn How to Market Both You and Your Art.

In my experience as both gallery owner and art dealer I have witnesses this same scenario time in and time out.

Two comparable pieces of art, each created by two different artists. One sells for $500 and the other for $10,000.

Why?

It has and will always come down to marketing and sales skill. One artist painted and displayed work in a gallery as the sole means of promoting.

The other artists would do promotional actions like press releases highlighting their new work, they had a professional website, they got interviews with art magazines, they networked with other artists, art professionals, and art enthusiasts, they got their work published in a coffee table books or calendars.

The outlets to make your artwork known are infinite, the point being, you are going to have to learn this skill of marketing so that you can apply it to yourself as an artist and to your artwork.

You could always hope that you create such an incredible work of art that the buzz created just by your painting will have the public beating down the door with cash in hand.

However that takes the responsibility of your success out of your hands and places it into the hands of the public.

When it comes to art, the public can be a very fickle entity indeed.

Honestly, do you really desire anything involving or related to the word fickle in charge of your destiny?

Rule 3: Do Not Succumb to Fear of Rejection or Failure.

Everyone has heard some variation of the story about the author who has a closet full of manuscripts that have never been read by another soul due to fear of rejection.

The same phenomena can happen to visual artists.

Many successful painters still do not view their own work to be perfect. So if you wait till your work is "perfect" then you may very well be dead of old age before perfection happens.

Don't be afraid to get your work out there. People will love your work, hate your work, see it as mediocre, or see it as the beginning of a new renaissance.

Taste in art differs widely and you will never win over everybody.

Rule 4: You Will Give the Critics ZERO Attention.

I am not just talking about art critics, but just negative people in general. A lot people on this planet are miserable and they like to drag others down with them.

Some are overt in your face, "you'll never be any good." At least they are easy to spot.

The worst are the ones that give back handed compliments or deftly slide that needle of criticism into the conversation by use of passive aggressive means.

'That last painting that you made was MUCH better than this one, I don't intend to be rude BUT.., That is very good work for a student, but there is soooooo much competition out there in the professional world,' etc etc.

Of course if you called them on it they would profess innocence, say that you are over reacting, that they were just kidding. Don't buy it.

If you can, just don't associate with these people, if they are our family don't talk about your art work with them. Hopefully you are an aspiring artist because you love to make art, not due to some misguided attempt to impress your family.

If you have no choice in being around these people just recognize that they are just lonely unhappy people, and above all, do not take it personally.

The only critique one should listen to is your professional drawing or painting instructor.

And be wary of that as well, make sure that at the same time they are critiquing your work that they are also showing you how to improve.

Rule 5: Speaking of Art Instructors, You Will Choose a Good One.

My spouse came to the states on a student visa from Canada to study drawing and painting in University.

My wife's first semester involved taking basic sketching and panting classes.

She arrived eager to learn the fundamentals of the visual arts, line drawing, tones, use of color, proportion, and the use of light and shadow.

Instead she received a lot of airy fairy over significant mumbo jumbo. The main technique taught was the 'if it feels good then do it' technique.

No substantial techniques were taught to the students simply because the instructors did not know them, or if they did they knew ABOUT them, but didn't really KNOW them!

When choosing any art school, whether it be painting, dance, music, acting, please PLEASE choose one that teaches the fundamentals and basics of the art.

Speak with your potential art instructor, Make sure that you inspect their work AND their students art as well.

Ask the potential teacher how they go about teaching the basics to a new student.

Rule 6: You Must Learn to Sell (or find someone who can and will)

The odds are, if you work is displayed anywhere where people can view it someone will come along who likes it, maybe even love it.

The problem comes in convincing them that they love your painting more than they love their money.

This is not as hard as it looks. All you have to do is handle any of the potential customers objectives and interest them continually in your work and in you as the artist.

If you absolutely think that selling your art work is demeaning to the concept of art that it totally fine. There is still a way to be an artist and not have to live in your mothers basement. You have to enlist someone who will do it for you.

Rule 7. Learn to Harness the Power of the Internet.

Take a look at ebay, type in 'original oil painting' into its search field. You will see hundreds of paintings from artists selling their work online.

Type in 'fine artists' into any search engine and you will find professional websites featuring professional artists.

There are a few websites that even act as an online art gallery and will display and sell your work online for you for a cut of the sale.

The world wide web happens to be a splendid way to show of your artwork, garner brand recognition, and to dissiminate your art to a massive international audience.

Rule 8: You Will Not Get Weird About Art and Money.

I know some of you cringe when it comes to selling your art for money, or that some of these tips might sound a little too business like, with words like brand recognition, professional, selling and marketing.

Like it or not, if someone exchanges money for your art you have entered into the field of business.

When you come to this fork in your career as an artist you can take one of two paths.

Path one, never sell your art for money, continue to work at your day job and keep art as a hobby. Perfectly acceptable. Many people do this across the world and lead happy lives.

Path two, realize that your art is providing someone with a product that they will adore for years to come, You created something original. Nothing in this world is it's exact duplicate.

For this you will receive money in exchange. This will help you concentrate on creating more works of art as you may have to work less hours at a 'real' job. Maybe you will get to the point of not having to work that 'real' job at all!

Michelangelo was commissioned by the Vatican to do his work in the Sistine Chapel. He was paid quite handsomely for it.

He was also commissioned by Florence to create the statue of David.

Artists can create wonderful enduring works and should rightfully be exchanged properly with.

Well there you have them, 8 rules you need to live by to become a professional visual artist.

I sincerely hope that they help and I wish you the best of luck in how ever you decide to pursue the field of art.

About the Author:

Eric Hines has had the pleasure of working professionally in the art industry with fellow artists for the majority of his working life as an artist, art dealer, musician, and currently as an executive at Mission Renaissance. Mission Renaissance teaches art lessons to over 5,000 art students every single week. They teach both children and adults how to draw and paint

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Want to Become a Professional Visual Artist? Here are the 8 Rules You Need to Live By

What your Music Profile Should Say About you

July21
Author: Artistopia Staff

Your online music profile is the bottom-line essential information on WHO you are as a band, singer, songwriter and/or musician. Your profile, as to how it fits in the big picture at Artistopia, an artist development site for indie and unsigned artists, is your biography or resume that presents you to the music industry, other musicians, and your potential fans. That makes it a very important page on the Internet, right? It needs to be interesting, well-written, informative and to-the-point, for this is you marketing yourself. When writing this document, there is much to consider to make it presentable.

Consider these scenarios:
1
2

In the Internet world, any webmaster will tell you content is king. Why? Because it is how online visitors find you. The number one source for driving traffic to web pages are search engines, and it is content they want and nothing else. (Content is literally text, characters, paragraphs, sentences – it's information.) You can easily improve the traffic to your profile by entering as much relevant content about yourself as is necessary to describe your music, history, act, image, and musical goals.

Knowing this and knowing that in this busy-busy click-happy Web world, you have to have your band description clearly stated at the top of the bio! The rest of the fill-in details are at the bottom. If you have captured the readers attention at the top, they will follow through and read more. Otherwise, they will leave your profile and look for another band that presents themselves better than you did.

The best place to start is by creating an outline, in Word (or other program). Know how many total characters you can use in the field you are entering information in. Use spell-check and save it for later updating. Collect your thoughts and make notes about your background, your musical history, goals, accomplishments, band members, who plays which instrument, etc.

* The music business is a BUSINESS so present yourself professionally.

The first paragraph should be an introduction. It is the lead-in to who you are, what your music specialty is (genre), where in the world you are from, and perhaps an enthusiastic quote given to you about your music. If you sound like a certain pro band or artist, what makes you different from them?

* Busy industry people may not finish reading after a few lines if the opener does not capture them quickly. And you have to live up to the hype you dish out!

The second paragraph could cover what you are currently up to musically. Here you might mention a new release you are working on, or music projects you are involved with. What promotional plans do you have to support your current activities? Mentioning an upcoming tour or gig would be good here.

The third paragraph will include band member information (who plays what) or brief mention of background experiences, instrumentation, and/or accomplishments, that accentuates your artistic development. Artistopia offers locations for detailed information on these entries, so use the available space to present yourself wisely.

The Mission Statement section will cover your music career goals and is aimed at the industry professionals that might be searching for your particular talent. The Influences section will be who your musical influences are, so there is no need to waste the readers time mentioning them elsewhere.

You have to remember, A&R reps, labels, producers, potential collaborators, are all very busy people that have heard it all before. Do not waste words but find a way to stand out from the typical. The music you create may bring them to your profile after they heard it to learn more about you, so it is up to you to show them that you are a person that they can work with.

It is absolutely amazing to see artists that don't take the time to do this. In countless web travels and thousands of music profiles, you see artist descriptions from as short as a one-liner like "We want to be heard," to certain social site artist descriptions that go for MILES. There is a big difference in giving the reader vital information that should be included your profile and info that no one will ever care about that should not.

Therein is the essence of what your music profile should be saying about you.

About the Author:

Artistopia - The Ultimate Artist Development Resource http://www.artistopia.com is an artist development and community on the web providing indie and unsigned music artists, songwriters and bands all the tools needed for music business collaboration and networking.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - What your Music Profile Should Say About you

The Four Pillars for Artist Success

July21
Author: Greg Katz

Everyone feels that the artist life is glamorous and easy, but that's the furthest from the truth. The number of artists making their living from their art is small and those who do have a sustainable business work very hard splitting their lives between creativity and business.

If you want to create an "art business" the four pillars of success are: vision; challenge; perseverance and motivation. Developing actions surrounding the four pillars will give you a giant leap from "Starving Artist" to "Successful Artist".

Vision As artists we have over developed right hemispheres of our brain so creativity is not in short supply. The interesting thing is that we don't use that creativity as it pertains to our business. Having a vision for your business will enable you to begin a different type of portfolio, a business portfolio.

Take the time to be specific about how you want your art to serve in your life. If your art is your bread and butter then you must treat it that way, with respect and lots of elbow grease. If your art is an avocation, then what do you want to accomplish and by when.

It's important to develop the road map to success or you'll wander aimlessly, you'll become discouraged and you'll put out the fire better known as your dream. Set an intention and once you've set the intention build upon that intention. Each action you take should support your vision, shoring up the first pillar of success.

Challenge If the business of art were easy then every artist would be successful. When we challenge ourselves creatively we are looking for new ways to express ourselves. The same is true in our business, the challenge is to show potential buyers that you wear more than one hat and you do it with conviction.

One of the key challenges for artists is not confidence in their work, but in how they present their work to the world. Artists are notorious for engaging in conversations from a one down position. We feel as if there is a caste system and we struggle to be taken seriously as an entrepreneur. Standing in the role of entrepreneur takes practice. It takes support from others and encouragement from peers. When you take yourself seriously as an "artrepreneur" others will follow suit.

Perseverance I've heard it said that it takes three years to become an overnight sensation. I believe that to be true and I see it as I attend gallery openings, poetry readings and other venues of artistic expression. Those who have separated themselves from the pack have one thing in common, perseverance.

The successful artist has to be focused and find renewable sources of energy to keep moving forward on the journey. The primary factor that hinders perseverance is isolation. When artists have a support system they are more inclined to stay the course toward their vision. They are able to unload the emotional detours that arise from not getting selected for a show or not getting a call back for an audition. We gain strength by the cheerleading squad we've assembled in our lives. Create a success team to help you navigate your unchartered waters and you'll be amazed at the results.

Motivation You would think creating beautiful work would be enough motivation, but that is the external motivating factor. How do you keep the internal flames that propel you forward burning bright? Reward yourself! We all love rewards and by creating our own incentive program keeps us in the game.

Having mile markers along the way that show your success in measurable outcomes is essential for maintaining motivation. Ever wonder why nonprofit organizations or religious institutions create a huge thermometer during their fundraising drives? It's to show the public the progression of their mission. As they get closer to the top it draws others who want to be a part of putting the organization over the top. Create your own gauge and make it visible so it stays in your consciousness. When you hit the top of the gauge be sure and shout it from the rooftops because you've shown that motivation yields results and that is evident by your success, both personal and professional.

Greg Katz is a national juried artist and the owner of the Artist Success Studio, a virtual artist community that transforms "Successful Artist' from oxymoron to declarative fact.

About the Author:
Greg Katz is a national juried artist and the owner of the Artist Success Studio, a virtual artist community that transforms \\\"Successful Artist\\\' from oxymoron to declarative fact. Greg can be reached at 720-851-6736 or visit his website at www.artistsuccessstudio.com.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - The Four Pillars for Artist Success

posted under Artful Careers, Balancing Life And Art, Presentation Is Everything, Promote Yourself Online, The Business of Art | Comments Off on The Four Pillars for Artist Success

Steps for Making a Binder Portfolio – Part 1 of 3

July21
Author: CD Mohatta

The nature of your portfolio will depend to some degree on the kind of art or craft you make. Sometimes it is possible to use the actual art and sometimes instead you need to include photographs or drawings of the art.

Use the original art where possible. This may determine the size of your binder. If you are to include photographs of your art or craft, you must learn how to take good photographs so that your art can be seen well. You can assemble a portfolio in three or four steps. If you have a lot of your work on hand, you may be able to make one in an afternoon, but even if you must start making your art or crafts from scratch, you should be able to have a portfolio completed within a month.

Your first step is to select and purchase a good binder or presentation case. You don't have to spend a lot of money, but you want to take care that you choose something that is attractive and does not appear too cheap. If you are including original artwork, you may want to look for a larger size, perhaps 11" x 14" or 14" x 17". Larger than that can become awkward to keep with you and limit it's use. Portfolios of modest size that hold standard typing paper are very convenient to carry, and still large enough in most cases to serve your needs. Very small binders about the size of a baby-brag book could be useful for showing jewelry, or as a duplicate portfolio small enough to keep with you always, but it is too small for most professional use.

Look for a binder where you can easily exchange your artwork or photographs, so that you can keep your portfolio current and improve it. Avoid permanently affixing any art or photo to the binder. Page protectors can be very helpful in keeping your artwork and photos clean, and you can then mount photos to pieces of quality paper with hinges and write descriptions on the paper. This also makes it easy to switch out examples of your work. Catalogs and art stores will have examples of portfolio systems for you to consider.

About the Author:

Social network users, add new myspace surveys to your profile. Try out new myspace comments and myspace graphics to comment your friends on any social network.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Steps for Making a Binder Portfolio - Part 1 of 3

The Challenge of Writing an Artist’s Statement That is Artistic and Deep But Also Makes Sense

July21

By Kathy Ostman-Magnusen

Often, while viewing other artists experiences with their creativity, defined by pen to paper within their "Artist's Statements", I find myself thinking, "This reminds me of man trying to define God by putting creativity into a box." Oft times too I wonder, "What the heck are they talking about? I wonder if even 'they' even know."

I have met all kinds of artists. I always hope that I will share some kind of phenomenon with fellow artists, of an unmistakable vibration we both generate and feed off of. I hope that our connection will cause us to reach new heights and feel compelled to go home and create great things. I rarely come across artists like that, they are as different from one another as anyone.

I really do believe there is an 'energy' within art, colors, and it is that energy about a piece of art that people resonate to.. or not. Some only like only my precise artwork, of which I feel are renderings and not in my personal opinion, 'true art'. It tells me that we are not connected in a 'spiritual' sense. We connect on other levels though so consequences of that kind of thinking are not something that needs to be brooded over, on the outside chance you find my opinion offensive or objectionable.

I think a lot of 'art talk' is mumbo jumbo, and is as redundant and boring as the latest football player explaining how his team is going to win the next game. Yet, I also think there is a need for the artist to describe the connection they feel with their art. Doing that, helps the viewer to enter their world, as well as the artist to understand 'what the heck happened' to cause them to create what they did.

Creativity is elusive, but the more we enter that gate, the more we find ourselves in the presence of something truly remarkable. I think the vibration of colors, coupled with the spirit of the dance of creative action, can be found in all kinds of art and no one has the market on that. Once in a great while we come across genius like Leonardo da Vinci and we stand in awe. Because of miraculous adventures of the soul, in any genre, it is our responsibility to pursue the unknown. Leonardo da Vinci only scratched the surface. Pursuing the vibrations of the elusive is often an alone experience. It is within that 'prayer' of sorts that mystics are uncovered. There are many ways of doing it though, as there are religions, so I don't think anyone has the key to it all.

So how do you do it? How do you write an "Artist's Statement" that makes sense? First define who you are within your work in your own mind. If you do not know, you won't be able to write anything at all that others will comprehend. Be careful of the mumbo jumbo, but write out your heart as you look at your work. You may just discover a part of yourself you had not met before. Take your time, discover who you are. Remember da Vinci as well, nothing he did was done without extreme confrontation of what it was he was looking to explore, so laziness is not acceptable. Right? Yes!

ABOUT Kathy Ostman-Magnusen: I am an artist, represented by Monkdogz Urban Art, New York. ORIGINAL ART may be purchased through Monkdogz: http://www.monkdogz.com/chelseagallery/artistart/Magnusen/artist_magnusen.htm

My newest website: http://www.kathyostman-magnusen.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kathy_Ostman-Magnusen
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On-line Art Galleries can assist in the career and business development of an Artist

July21
Author: Susan

It is often difficult for an artist to find a gallery prepared to take their work. Even if they do find an art gallery, the art gallery may restrict the number of art works hung and space or time permitted for an exhibition. But the main problem for most newer artists is the question of being unknown. Unless an artist is already known it is almost impossible to find a gallery willing to handle their work. But how to become known and how to earn some income in the meantime?

Even when an art gallery is located and terms agreed there is the question of commission and sales tax which can mean that the gallery and the picture framer earn more than the artist.

The commercial aspect of a working life in art is a difficult one to manage. It is rare that an artist makes a reasonable living from art without having to supplement with other work such as teaching. An artist can also attempt to raise their profile by entering competitions and with luck and talent gain prize money also.

Artists are turning to the internet to increase their audience exposure and assist in making sales of their work.

Many on-line art galleries however have no selection criteria for work submitted and further they do not permit dedicated space for each artist. The end result is that an artist's work does not show in any cohesive manner, unless the user already knows the name of the artist and searches for their name.

On-line art gallery space with selection and dedicated gallery space per artist

About the Author:

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - On-line Art Galleries can assist in the career and business development of an Artist

Making the Connection: Customer Relationships That Build Your Business

July21

By Kathy Gulrich

Have you ever wondered why you often find a coupon tucked inside your cereal box, or get invited to a customer preview sale at your favorite department store? Those companies know that their existing customers are the best - and most profitable - customers they'll ever have. So it's not surprising that they'll do whatever they can to keep these customers happy and coming back again and again.

Believe it or not, the same concept holds true for your art career. While you don't want to ignore potential customers, you'll find that when you pay a little more attention to the customers and collectors you already have, it will really pay off - in increased sales and profits for your art business. The following 10 practical strategies will get you started.

1 - Understand how and why your customers buy art

Put yourself in your customers' shoes. What's in it for them when they purchase your art? Maybe they feel great about owning a piece of original artwork. Or they're happy to support an emerging artist. Perhaps they're looking forward to showing their new painting to friends. Start listening to your customers and asking questions, and you'll learn a lot - fast.

Don't underestimate the power of being an art collector yourself. You'll know firsthand how your collectors feel when they purchase your work, and you'll be a great role model for them. Even better, you'll be supporting other artists.

2 - Make the first purchase a fabulous experience

When you sell a piece of artwork, remember that it's also an exciting event for your customers. So let them be excited about their purchase. Accept any compliments graciously. Then share something personal that lets them know that you're excited about the sale, too. Tell them how the sale is meaningful to you: It's your first; your first to someone in New Jersey; your first in this series, or your last one like this. A positive connection now can pay off for years to come.

3 - Be businesslike in everything you do

Treat your art as a business, and treat your customers in a businesslike manner. Be meticulous about meeting deadlines and keeping appointments. Always provide the materials or information you promised - complete, and on time. And remember to thank your collectors personally when they attend one of your shows or support you in any way. A quick note or an e-mail will be appreciated, and remembered.

In addition, be businesslike when you price your artwork. Keep your pricing consistent: from the gallery to your studio, and from city to city. And stick to your prices no matter what; never discount your work.

Naturally, it makes sense to present yourself in a professional manner every time you show someone your work. That said, never try to be someone you're not. Let your personality come through, and you'll be the best businessperson you can be: you.

4 - Make it easy for your customers to purchase more of your work

I was at a friend's house recently and admired a beautiful hand-made journal she'd purchased at a local craft fair. Thinking it would make a perfect gift for another friend, I asked for the artist's name. When she didn't remember, we looked inside the journal and discovered the artist's name and phone number were nowhere to be found. The result? He or she lost a sale.

Put your contact information on everything that leaves your studio: letterhead, invitations, show announcements, note cards, etc. Affix a personalized label on the back of each painting that includes your name, plus your e-mail address or Web site.

And send your new collectors home with an "Artist Pack": a professional-looking folder with your business card, resume, artist statement, bio, articles about you and by you, and so on. Youíll be amazed at how often your customers will share it with their friends and associates.

5 - Ask for another sale

When liquid shampoo first came out, it gave consumers a convenient and easy way to wash their hair. "Lather and rinse," the label said. But shampoo sales really took off when just one word was added. Your shampoo bottle now says, "Lather, rinse, and repeat if desired."

Repeat sales can revolutionize your business, too. So display your work in your home and studio where visitors will see it. And when customers are making a purchase, be bold: Ask them if they'd like to purchase a second (or third) piece. Ask your collectors for referrals to another collector, or to a shop or gallery where they think your work might fit in. Or suggest a commissioned piece you'd like to do for them. The key here is to ask for the sale.

6 - Upgrade your customers

Another way to increase your income is to upgrade your customers to a more profitable product ("deluxe" shampoo for color treated hair, for example). It's really pretty easy, once you get the hang of it. Here are some upgrade ideas that have worked well for my clients:

• Encourage your customers who ordinarily buy giclee reproductions to purchase an original painting.

• Introduce your existing customers to some of your more expensive or larger pieces of art.

• If you have collectors who so far have bought only your sketches or drawings, suggest they purchase one of your paintings next time.

7 - Cross-sell your customers

Cross-selling is simply selling your customers something different from - but related to - what they're already buying. Think back to the shampoo example. Wouldn't it be relatively easy to cross-sell hair conditioner to someone who already uses shampoo?

Now take a look at your own artwork. Cross-selling might mean selling a piece of your pottery to one of your painting customers, selling a painting to one of your sculpture collectors, or suggesting your art note cards as an add-on sale when a customer stops by to pick up his pet portrait. Be imaginative, and you can increase both sales and profits.

8 - Get to know your customers and collectors

Remember that your customers are people first, customers second. Take your relationships beyond "business" and build personal relationships, as well. If appropriate, invite them to social gatherings, send a holiday card or drop them a postcard from your favorite vacation spot.

When you're chatting with your collectors, make it a habit to listen for important dates and occasions. Then remember their very special occasions with an artwork gift. Imagine having a small piece of your artwork forever connected in your collectors' minds with their 50th anniversary, the birth of their first child or grandchild, or their son's graduation from medical school. Sometimes a little goes a very long way.

9 - Let your customers get to know you - and your art

Don't you just love it when you get to watch another artist at work and see for yourself how they do what they do? You're not alone.

Almost all art collectors are curious about how you create. So it makes good business sense to find ways to share your process with them. You might invite them to an informal demo. Show them photographs of the location that inspired you. Or even let them try the process themselves. Take the time to show your customers what makes you and your art unique.

Customers who understand how you apply your paint, why you use those strange-looking long brushes, or how you get so many layers of color onto your canvas are not only educated about what you do - they're interested in what you do. And that will translate into more sales, and more referrals.

10 - Build strong, ongoing relationships with your collectors

Don't be shy about asking your customers for advice and input, whether it's on how you showcase or hang your work, or on new projects or techniques you're trying out. Do it one-on-one, or host a studio open house (notice I did not say "studio sale") to find out what they think.

And when you've just finished a new series or collection, or you're ready to hang a new gallery show, invite your best customers to your studio for a special preview of your new work. They'll love it.

Most importantly, be yourself with your customers and collectors. Yes, you may meet a collector or two who wants to be dazzled by art double-talk and rhetoric. Most collectors, however, will want to get to know the real you. They'll love hearing about your feelings about your artwork, some of your artistic quirks - and even some of the mistake youíve made.

Once customers and collectors really connect with you and your work, they'll be back for more. And that's good for every artist's business.

Best-selling author Kathy Gulrich helps clients get from idea, to action, to results - more quickly, and more easily - whether they're looking to write a book, develop a new product, or market their product or business. Clients love her direct, no-nonsense approach - and her gentle insistence on great results. Find out for yourself: Check out one of Kathy's teleclasses, or pick up a free worksheet, at http://www.smARTbusinessCoaching.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kathy_Gulrich
http://EzineArticles.com/?Making-the-Connection:-Customer-Relationships-That-Build-Your-Business&id=34940

Master Quality Song Demo Reels That Sizzle!

July21
Author: Tom Gauger

As a former talent booking agent with the William Morris Agency and founder of ReelMusician.com, I can tell you that reviewing demos can be both a curse and a blessing. Even as demos pile up on the desks in A&R offices and music industry professional's office floors as well, I can almost guarantee that the vast majority of demos 1) won't have a chance, 2) don't get listened to, at least by the major A&R folks and not through a pres-screening process utilizing college interns, and 3) it might not even be the music itself, but the packaging and marketing colors, etc that are used for the artist press kit that result in the artist contract denial. What makes for a master quality demo? What makes for a master quality demo that will get listened to? These are great questions and I can tell you that a host of folks will have all kinds of ideas and suggestions; I will consider some gut level thinking and ideas that I have mentally compiled through the years that I've always felt would be an asset not only musically, but from a marketing perspective as well. Hopefully there will be some nugget of truth that you can capitalize on to further your music career and song demos

As we begin to look at master quality demos and what makes them up, what are your goals and ambitions? The reason I am asking this is because not only does it help to mentally prepare you and help you set goals for your career, but it also helps set the blueprint for where and what your demo ought to be sounding and looking like. There is a big difference in submitting your demo to A&R folks and to the club owner trying to gain playing gigs. But regardless of where you are submitting your demo, you have to exude a professionalism and character of not only your music, but in the credibility of the act as well. That last statement is critical. If your act is perceived as credible with the ball rolling and with some key elements in place, you are much more likely to be 1) reviewed by the actual A&R director and 2) any enthusiasm might snowball down the halls of the record company ultimately landing you a record deal.

But let's get back to your demo. At ReelMusician.com we compile demos for songwriters and for jingle singers trying to break into the jingle singing market and I can tell you from experience, that it's difficult to create a master quality demo when the song itself is not master quality song demo material. So be honest about any material you are recording. Is this top 10 if given the chance, or is this a filler, b side song? Yes, you can take a fair song and make it "listenable" to with a great production, but it still reasons that a fair or b side song cut is still a fair or b side song. You look back through the years at songs that held your attention and were almost mesmerizing and this is before the onslaught of incredible and affordable recording gear. These songs were just plain great songs even without the slickest of today's recording abilities.

As you record, don't rely on a bunch of "recording tricks" or padding type effects that detract and try to uphold an otherwise fair song. Many individuals with a lot more authority can speak about effects, etc than I, but I will say that less is more, and you ought to be concerned about the quality of the song and production utilizing all effects that are needed and not just effects thrown in there without reason or cause.

Who are using for players on your demos? Obviously if you are a band you are recording your whole group, but if you are a solo act or a writer creating master demos, then consider a couple of options. If money is not an object, then go for the whole rhythm section and keyboard pads, etc. One thing that you need to know and understand is that it is better to use fewer players who are just incredible, than to have the full rhythm section with less experienced players or players that just can't support your song. I remember years back when I was first starting out before all of our TV and radio credits, that for the sake of having a full sound I compromised the overall production for players, while more affordable, not as seasoned and consequently my productions were not as strong until I learned that valuable lesson. And even today, I will choose to use a first string guitar or piano player in lieu of a full rhythm section on projects if that's what the song and production call for. Always get the best musicians - It always pays. These players oftentimes have ideas and broaden your production and bring incredible artistical elements that you wouldn't have thought of – Which leads me to my next point.

Keyboards are incredible and there is a vast array of sounds and pads that can be used to create all kinds of emotional tones in your music, but don't get caught in the, "I have a keyboard, mic and computer syndrome. Your music will suffer. You want the creativity of other players. They bring the musical magic that most of us, quite honestly, aren't creative enough to capture, but with their experience, and talent, they are able to deliver not only incredible rips, but a professionalism your demo might not never otherwise of had. Utilize the best players possible whenever you can. I can tell you that our demos at ReelMusician.com sound incredible because of our effort in obtaining the best players - Get the best!

With a few moments left, let's look at some important final notes and ideas. Don't get discouraged after recording a song you thought would turn out differently. You know, without sounding cliché, productions and songs do getter with time and practice. Always look at money spent on demos as schooling. Where would you go to learn the lessons you just learned? - From a textbook, of course not. Keep at it; be honest about your writing and productions. Continue to learn from great writers and producers. Listen to great classical writers as well and broaden your next pop ballad string arrangement. Don't be afraid to try new ideas. Get the best players in an affordable, yet quality studio, and hopefully you'll start recording the next top ten hit!

About the Author:

Mr Gauger is a former talent booking agent with the William Morris Agency and founder of http://www.ReelMusician.com . You may contact the author at tgauger@reelmusician.com . Free e-books "The Jingle Singer's Guide," and "Secrets To Great Song Demos," may be downloaded at http://www.ReelMusician.com .

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Master Quality Song Demo Reels That Sizzle!

Interactive Art Installation for Art Exhibition Promotion

July21
Author: Antonia Marino

There are so many art exhibitions around that it is essential to make your exhibition stand out from the crowd. One way to achieve this is by having a drawcard to attract visitors. An interesting and successful idea is to create an interactive art installation at the venue to entice visitors into the exhibition and to engage them with participation.

An interactive art installation is usually a large sculptural piece specifically created for the event which the audience can use, play with, interact with, influence, solve and/or manipulate in some way. Their participation allows them to experience a result of some kind. This adds an additional dimension to their exhibition experience and is particularly successful if your installation is unique, fun, challenging or enlightening in some way.

When designing your art installation consider the overall theme of your exhibition, your intended target market, and the available facilities at the exhibition venue.

Exhibition Theme

It is important to make your art installation and art exhibition theme cohesive. If your audience cannot see a logical connection between them your drawcard may not be as successful. Therefore give plenty of consideration to this aspect of your idea. For example, if your exhibition theme is "Urban Landscape", choose an industrial type installation using inorganic materials, hard shapes and modern fittings.

Other questions to ask yourself when designing your art installation are the possible results of audience participation. Do you want them to have a unique experience, or a pre-determined answer? Are you trying to make a statement, tell a message relating to your theme, or do you want your audience to come up with their own conclusions? These questions will help you to refine your idea and create a installation that best suits your exhibition.

Target Market

Tailor-make your art installation to your target market for maximum success. This is important in all areas of business marketing and your art exhibition should be no exception. A target market is usually defined as demographics such as age, gender, geography and socio-economic group.

If your audience is predominantly young middle class college students, your installation should be young, fresh, innovative and modern. On the other hand, if your target market is mainly elderly, upper class art investors you would approach both the exhibition and your art installation in a totally different way. Ask the venue what their customer demographics are in order to give yourself the best start.

Exhibition Venue

When creating your art installation it is very important to consider the venue in every aspect of the design. Visit the exhibition space and plan out the shape and size of the area available to you. Take lots of photographs, capturing every angle. Use a long retractable tape measure to take measurements of the room, noting the dimensions of the walls, including ceiling to floor height. Measure and record the size and locations of all doorways, windows, pillars, permanent light fixtures and electrical sockets. Take particular note of the main entrance way and how the audience will move around the installation.

Finally, ask the venue what resources they have on site, such as ladders, plinths, partitions and portable lighting. These will come in handy for your installation, and may cut down construction or display costs. Whether you are using props and equipment belong to the venue, supplying your own, or hiring them, ensure they are safe to use. This is particularly important if using electrical appliances such as portable lighting. Your audience safety and well-being is paramount.

An interactive art installation can become a value asset to your next art exhibition by making it stand out from the crowd. With just a few important design considerations you can maximise its promotional potential and make your exhibition a huge success.

About the Author:

Antonia Marino is an artist and business owner with over 15 years experience in the art industry. Her current project is ArtBiz Resources, which provides downloadable art business documents and forms for artists, galleries and exhibitions at http://www.artbizresources.com/.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Interactive Art Installation for Art Exhibition Promotion

What Stands Between You and Your Artist Statement?

July21
By Ariane Goodwin
Is it a dry creek bed, or the Grand Canyon? A closed door, or the Chase Manhattan Bank vault? Or maybe, it's the whisper of many doubts: Artist statements are so predictably icky. What can you say about your work that someone else can't simply see? What's the point of words for a visual experience? How am I going to be authentic, but not arrogant? Sincere, but not sentimental?

And yet, you know that pros consider artist statements an essential part of a good portfolio (or About Me pages essential to a web site). Gallery owners are relieved by your professionalism. People who love your work will know more about you. Offering your audience more ways to connect with you increases their delight, as well as the perceived value of your work. But, goodness, all those daunting words between here and there!

For artists, words are a completely different experience from the tactile world of art making. Paper and paint inhabit the world of our senses, while words remain the detached curios of our mind. If we're an Independent Professional, we want to reserve center stage for our business. Once in a while, when the two worlds of work and words connect, language entices our senses and engages our imaginations, and we love it.

So what stops us from using words to describe our art? Tell about ourselves? These are the same words that have been with us since we could walk. What causes us to be deeply suspicious of language, one of our fundamental connections to being human?

The answer, in part, relates to a fatal combination of art critics and education. Art critics use language as scepters of judgment. If words are the messengers that determine our self-worth, then by all means, kill the messenger. Formal education uses language as bastions of control. If we are told when, where and how we can, or cannot, use which words, we grow to mistrust our relationship to language. The mistrust smolders underground, mostly unnoticed, until our words are thrust into a container, like the artist statement or About Me/Us web page.

Suddenly, words make us visible targets for judgment and criticism, so we hide our discomfort at this possibility with what we consider rational responses. "My work speaks for itself." "Statements are inconsequential to my work." "I have nothing to say that my work doesn't already convey." And the list goes on.

An opportunity, like writing a personal or artist statement, often causes us to second guess every idea we ever had about our work. We convince ourselves that we have nothing, really, to say, or for certain, nothing of value. Our first instinct is to either turn off the light and head out of the studio or office, or pump up our peacock feathers.

But running away only confirms our unspoken fear: there must be something to run away from. And pumping up encourages us to use flimsy or pretentious words to smother over our mistrust of language. This, in turn, fuels our perception that language related to our work is simply ludicrous.

Luckily, there is an alternative. Try pretending, that you have a lot to say, which is neither self-important nor trivial, but relevant and revealing. Imagine that all of your objections have been met and you are simply going to write whatever you believe to be true, at the moment, about your relationship to your work. Because, the good news is: you can recover your own words.

Why and how do you do what you do?

There is an unselfconscious language about your work, which you use all the time. Every time you talk or think about your work, you create a relationship between words and your chosen passion. The trick is to learn how to catch yourself doing this, and then faithfully write it down. Yup, I said: write it down. How else will you engage that part of your brain for continued support and help?

But why bother at all?

Because an artist statement or personal statement builds a compelling bridge between you and your audience. An inspiring statement gives the people who see your work another reason to remember you. It's reinforcement, clean and simple. And there's not an artist or independent professional around who can't use a little extra reinforcement to make it's way through the crowd.

Equally important, a statement gives you the opportunity to see what you do through the eyes of language, to validate your creation and profession from a new perspective. Really, you can't lose! You can only procrastinate.

Want to get started? Try this:

--TAKE care: Treat your statement with the same care that your treat your work; after all, all of it is you.

--GATHER raw materials: Use a notebook that is lovely or practical and keep it with you in the studio, in the car, in the office, beside your bed and take a few weeks to catch any fleeting thoughts that come to you about your work. Give your self permission to gather. Selecting and sorting comes later, when you have enough in your basket. Find a writing pen or pencil that flows smoothly across the surface. Make it a tacticle pleasure.

--TIME: Make a specific date with yourself. Respect this time. Do not tolerate interruptions.

--PREPARE your internal space: Close your eyes and conjure up your worst critic. In your mind's eye, lead this person out of the room. Give them another task, besides breathing over your shoulder, say, climbing a tree, skipping stones, or going to the local library. Tell your critic not to come back until you are ready. Critics are terrified of being abandoned, that's why they are so tenacious, so reassure yours that there will be a place set just for them at the editing and revision table. Critics are also stubborn. You may have to do this more than once.

--WRITE more than one: Like different works of art, a statement also thrives on change and rising out of "the moment." What suits this month's work may not work for the next month. Independent professionals need to revisit their intentions from time to time, and writing a new personal statement gets the juices flowing.

--GIVE yourself permission to make mistakes: Let yourself write badly. Crumple up lots of paper balls and throw them in a corner. It's the beginner's way. Then, when it comes out great, which it eventually will, you will know the difference.

--WRITE as much as you want: Winnowing down is so much easier than filling in later.

--DON'T hesitate to ask a professional: Some things just beg for help. If you find yourself endlessly circling a dead pigeon, really...aren't there other things you'd rather do and still get that statement written?

Ariane Goodwin helps artists take their careers to the next level, so they can make an honest living doing what they love. Besides art-career coaching and my seminal book, Writing the Artist Statement: Revealing the True Spirit of Your Work I also host the annual smARTist Telesummit , the only professional art-career conference online or off that helps you build your art career from the comforts of home You can also sign up for your weekly smARTips to advance your career one tip at a time.

How to Make an Art or Craft Portfolio?

July21
Author: CD Mohatta

Having a portfolio is still a very valuable tool for every crafter or artist with a business. Today a crafter or artist may keep their portfolio in a binder or keep digital images in an online portfolio. Each has it's advantages and you may wish to have both. A binder is accessible without a computer and you can keep in your car or take it with you when you meet with people. With an online portfolio you can send a link to the website through email, or print it on your business card, and a person can see your work without having to meet with you in person.

If you think a portfolio will help you, the most important thing to do is to begin it now, with whatever you have. Don't fuss on perfection before you have an existing portfolio. Books are written about professional portfolio making and seminars are taught at art schools, however, you can always improve the content and the appearance of your portfolio later. You can't, however, recover lost opportunities because you didn't have one to show to people interested in seeing what you do.

A binder portfolio can include small 2-dimensional art and photographs of larger or 3 dimensional art. Choose a binder of adequate size, but keep in mind that larger binders are more difficult to carry or take with you. Whatever style of binder you choose, do not permanently affix any of your photographs or art. This way, you can swap better pieces or photos for the least ones in your portfolio easily. Usually 12 - 24 items makes a good portfolio.

Sometimes, if your work is particularly small, for example, as with jewelry, you can make a sample case of the items instead of a binder containing photos. For a digital portfolio you will need a web page or other online location and digital images. Some artists choose a website that shows items they have for sale, and this doubles as a portfolio. It must, however, be kept current to display only what is available for purchase.

About the Author:

The author writes text and advises for content for myspace comments , myspace graphics and designs creative ideas for myspace layouts .

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - How to Make an Art or Craft Portfolio?

The Artist’s Statement: A Marketing Tool Every Artist Needs

July21
By  Suzanne Lieurance

If you're an artist or craftsperson offering your art in stores and galleries, you need an artist's statement. Do you have one? If not, you're missing out on a great marketing tool.

Artist's statements vary in length, form, and the material presented. Generally, though, an artist's statement should let readers know a bit about your background, include a few sentences about what you believe to be the most important aspects of your art, and describe the techniques, materials, and tools you use to create it.

Here are just a few ways your artist's statement can be used to promote your art:

1. It can help art consultants, gallery owners, and store salespeople better understand your work. The more they know about what you do, the better they are able to sell your work.

2. It helps reviewers, biographers, and reporters write reviews, profiles, and articles about you. They don't need to call you or meet with you for an interview. They simply use material from your statement, and other information from the store or gallery owner, to craft an announcement or review of your work for their newspaper or other publication.

3. It can be used to submit with grant applications and project proposals. Since your artist's statement offers a short explanation of your work and the techniques you use, it is a good summary piece to include with slides, photos, or other samples of your work when applying for funding.

4. It can encourage viewers to purchase your work because they may feel a deeper connection to your art after reading about it (and you) in your artist's statement.

If you've put off writing your own artist's statement because you've found it difficult to "toot your own horn," so to speak, then hire a professional writer to write your statement for you. Your artist's statement will become one of the most valuable marketing tools you'll use to promote your art.

Suzanne Lieurance is a children's author, freelance writer, and owner of the Three Angels Gourmet Co. Find out more about her children's books at http://www.suzannelieurance.com or get information about her freelance writing services (including artist's statements) at http://www.lieurancegroup.blogspot.com Her line of "heavenly gourmet mixes" is available online at http://www.threeangelsgourmet.com
Source: http://www.pacificarticles.com/articles/102/1/The-Artists-Statement-A-Marketing-Tool-Every-Artist-Needs/The-Artists-Statement-A-Marketing-Tool-Every-Artist-Needs.html

Artist Statement Resources

July21

By Sarah Schmerler

Author: Peter Elbow; Title: "Writing Without Teachers" by far, the best book I've found to advise artists on how to write.

Author: David Bayles; Title: Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils of Artmaking - inspiration and encouragement.

I've taught Writing for Artists for many years at The New School, and that Elbow book (until I write my own book!) is the only one I know that can start an artist off with the right attitude. What does Elbow say?: That you can't know what you're going to write until you begin writing. Writing, my artist friends, is a Process - no different than painting or printmaking or sculpting. Over-think it, over "outline" it, and you'll kill your own creativity. No one wants to read something cliched or boring or dry.

My advice: Don't make your artist statement sound like a "statement." Make it sound like you.

Stay away from telling us what your work is about.' Tell us about' yourself, and what you do. Just start with that, and be honest. Your reader will figure out the rest - and will be grateful to you for letting them make their own conclusions.

Here's my do's and don't list from recent workshops. It's better when internalized, over time. But for those who want a quick fix, here you go:

workshops, '09, statement do's and don'ts List

If you want me to edit or re-write your statement, you can contact me here .

About Sarah Schmerler
I've been an art critic and journalist in New York City for 12 years. My writing has appeared in newspapers like The New York Post and The New York Times, weekly magazines like TimeOut New York and The Village Voice, and monthly and bi-monthly publications like Art in America, ArtNews, Photograph, Art & Auction, and Art on Paper.

I've taught writing at The New School, and art history at Pratt Institute's School of Professional Studies and Medgar Evers College, CUNY, Brooklyn.

I've developed a writing methodology specifically geared toward visual artists. I help artists write great statements about their own and others' work.

And I've run an artist-writer collaborative called CoLAB since 2007. (You can read about our exploits soon.)

Sarah Schmerler.com

Artist Statements, Artist Biography Tips, And Resumes – Nuts and Bolts

July21
Nuts and Bolts

By Barbara Bowen

 "If you aim for a market you'll miss the mark." Whoever said that, I'm a believer. It's no good looking over the shoulder at what strangers prefer before creating. True inspiration is the optimal motivator. Quality issues from there, and its purity taps the nerves of audience attraction. That said, there are far too many masterpieces tucked on shelves behind the light of day. Strong promotional tools may be secondary to our motivation, but they're essential. Like the apex of an iceberg, they show first. They introduce our work, foster credibility, and mirror how far we've traveled along the arc of our goals. Those we know may direct us to new connections. But even then, we must support those connections with an effective "portrait" of who we are. Selling is a part of every career. Never underestimate the power of presentation. Why not enter the new season prepared with an updated, incisive, authentic, and powerful one? What do you need? A dynamic artist statement, artist biography and artist resume is the beginning. Effective artist portfolios and proposals are also important. Start now and stay ahead of the pack. So, what are the important elements of these essential artist presentation tools?

Artist Statement: Shaping your essential bond with viewers and sales An artist statement communicates what motivates you as an artist. It's the most personal part of your presentation; an opportunity to bring your viewers and potential buyers closer. It offers a glimpse of the person behind the work. While keeping it informative, let your personality show. Share your ideas and concerns, and how they are revealed in your work. Explain to viewers what your work means to you, not what it's supposed to mean to them. They will arrive at their own conclusions. It's okay to mention influences, but mostly keep prominent names associated with your career for your resume, where they will serve as testimonial and avoid the appearance of boasting. Give some details about your techniques and how they help you achieve your vision. Then, you might add a segment about how your approach is unique. Most general artist statements are around one page or less. Brevity sustains attention, so I lean toward three or four concise paragraphs. In some situations, a statement about a particular artwork may be requested. A statement can act as a marketing piece in certain commercial situations, which may be appropriate. So be sure to tailor your artist statement to its purpose.

Artist Biography: Creating a memorable snapshot of your career life An artist bio contains similar information to the artist resume but is presented in paragraph form, is less formal, and is most often written in the third person. It serves to highlight the information presented on your resume. It's a great way to convey a "snapshot" of your career experience.

Artist Resume: Detailing your career with clarity and professionalism Artist resumes detail the accomplishments, endeavors, and knowledge. They offer a full picture of your career, and the categories featured on the resume will depend upon your artistic discipline. It's important to update your resume on a regular basis, adding and deleting the listed activities, as appropriate. An artist resume can be one to four pages in length. Most artists have two versions prepared: a longer and shorter version. It's often best to use a professional paper stock, in white or ivory. The style of type varies, and can add to the resume's professionalism.

Artist Proposal: Standing out from the crowd with dynamic writing/shaping/editing Artists also use their portfolio to apply for specific projects, funding programs, residencies, or other competitive opportunities. These applications may ask you to submit a project description, details on your approach to the project, and a cover letter. These written materials should be tightly edited and tailored to the particular opportunity. Be passionate and sincere in the presentation of your work, and always conclude with thanking the panel, juror, and/or organization for their time and consideration. Typical questions for you to answer will be: Why are you an ideal applicant? How will you benefit the program or project? What technical qualifications, abilities, or personal assets can you contribute? How will you benefit from the opportunity? How would the project advance your career as an artist? How would you use the money awarded?

Visual Artist Portfolio: Keeping the heart and soul of your work evolving Your portfolio is the most valuable tool in your overall presentation. Your visuals are worth a thousand words, and an arresting portfolio can help close the gap, should your written materials be less developed, as in young artist on the career path. There are many approaches to a portfolio, depending upon the discipline. One universal ingredient to a successful portfolio is a sense of continuity. The transitions between and within subject matter must cohere. Color, tone, shape, scale, all must be considered when choosing what images to include and how to position them. This process involves subjectivity as well as objectivity. Most artists benefit greatly from feedback from a trained eye, and reactions from untrained eyes can also be helpful. A portfolio is most successful when modified and tailored, with acumen, for its particular audience. Many artists now supplement their physical portfolio with a digital version either on the Web or presented on CD-ROM or DVD. Stay current on new formats and choose the method(s) that feature your work most powerfully and support your marketing goals.

*Article by Barbara Bowen, founder of: http://www.GatewaysCoaching.com #NAME? for Creativity Coaching and http://www.GatewaysToAction.blogspot.com

Email Barbara your questions about creativity coaching and creating dynamic artist statements, bios, resumes and proposals. Learn about creative action projects through her Web sites. She would love to hear from you.*

Do you need content? You may use this article on your website, or in your newsletter. The only requirement is inclusion of the text above, including the active links. Thank you.

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An Artist’s Statement

July21
Author: Jo Mari Montesa

Of all the gifts God gave to man the finest is his free will. Second to life itself. It is the essence of man. It is what separates man from all the other creatures of God. By ones choice or action he is judged if he is worthy to be called the man created by God.

The child of free will is art. It is man's self-expression. It is synonymous to freedom of expression. Every art is unique since every man is unique. How man perceives art is also unique as how man perceives beauty. As how man perceive life.

Art is like life. It all depends to the person's perception. Truly beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder. The gauge of how beautiful life is, depends uniquely to every man.

A professor of mine once walked in the streets of Manila during summer. It is very hot, humid and dusty. He noticed a very old beggar asking for coins to the passers while bathing to the heat of the sun all day. Beside the beggar was a newspaper stand. One tabloid headline reads 'Young Matinee Idol Commits Suicide." My professor stops for awhile and asks himself how could this young man kill himself when he has everything. Money, women, good looks, popularity, youthfulness, what more could he ask for. While this old beggar is still striving for a few coins. Why not just threw himself to the vehicles speeding in front of him. Like my professor, my conclusion too is that it's all a matter of perception.

Like life the beauty of art depends solely to the individual. It is how man perceives art that makes it beautiful.

Those who believe that they found the beauty in life. Let as show that beauty to the world. Let as show our art.

About the Author:

Jose Mari Montesa or Jo Mari is a Visual Artist by talent. He has Masters Degree in Business Administration, Accountancy is his profession and currently working in a bank. But his heart really belongs to the Art world.

Since his boyhood he joined many art contests in different mediums. He has informal trainings in Painting, Technical Drawing and Photography. Also, a student and a believer of Humanities.

Jo Mari is also into Photography. He joined competitions both local and international. Some of his Photographic works are now in the hands of private collectors.

Right now the artist is concentrated in painting. Specifically Oil painting on canvas. He hopes that he will be known for this medium.

Most of his paintings are influenced by the rich culture and tradition in the Philippines. For example his series of Immaculate Concepcion oil paintings are inspired by the dark wood used in the icons of the Virgin Mary centuries ago when Spain brought Christianity to the Philippines. This type of wood are used to make the skin complexion of the Virgin similar to Asian or a Filipina.

Jo Mari have also done Landscapes, Still Life and Abstract paintings.

Jose Mari Jose Mari - http://www.artmajeur.com/jomari


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Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - An Artist's Statement

10 Ways to Sell Your Art, an Overview of Selling Options

July21
Author: Cathy Robertson

As an Artist you know there is no greater thrill than seeing your artwork on someone's wall; knowing that they love it, that you have brought joy into their world. Whether you're a part time hobby artist, a full time professional or somewhere in between there is always opportunity to sell your work. You may find that one or more methods work well for you. Pursue them. Hone your skills. Reap the rewards! Remember the old adage, "Nothing ventured, nothing gained ..."

Your Local Art Community

If you haven't already done so, check out your local 'art scene'. Many communities have organizations designed for the budding Artist. They offer classes, exhibits, information on local events (booth opportunities) and general art related resources. You may also fine resources through the Chamber of Commerce and your local Colleges and Universities. It's a great place to start.

Word of Mouth

Everyone loves to sell by word of mouth. It's free and you know people are talking good things about your art. Great word of mouth is every seller's dream.

Advantage: Someone else is marketing for you simply by giving their recommendation to a friend.

Disadvantage: In order for "word of mouth" to be affective, people have to know about it first!

Conclusion: It takes time to develop 'word of mouth' selling. Produce good work, conduct yourself with integrity and a great reputation will follow! It is worth its weight in gold.

Commissioned Work

With commissioned work, you sell it before you create it.

Advantage: You can pretty well expect to get paid for the job, assuming you deliver as promised.

Disadvantage: You have to market yourself to get the job. And you are obligated to paint within someone else's parameters rather than yours completely.

Conclusion: Working within boundaries forces you to solve the problems it presents. It forces creative solutions. Many of us do our best work when presented with unique challenges!

Event Booths

Event booths can be a fun way to sell your artwork and participate in the community.

Advantage: Booth rentals can be relatively inexpensive. You get to talk with people and promote your work. You get instant feedback. You know immediately how people feel about your artwork; everything from style, content, size and price. You get a 'feel' for the market. You have the opportunity to get the word out about you and your art; give out business cards or email contact.

Disadvantage: You have to deal with how you will accept payment (credit card, cash, check).You don't want someone to walk off with one of your paintings and find out their check was bad. You need to sell enough to cover your expenses. Event opportunities may not come around often enough to suit your taste or you may not have enough pieces to warrant having a booth.

Conclusion: Consider these - renting a booth with other Artists if you don't have enough work to fill the space; excepting credit cards or cash only; selling low price point prints or cards of your artwork to passers by (for spontaneous sales). Market yourself to the hilt. Tout your web site.

Your Own Web Site

Nowadays everyone seems to have their own web site. If you have anything to sell, people expect you to have one.

Advantage: It's fast, convenient and you're not confined to any one location. Your artwork is available for people around the world to see 24/7. Getting online can be done on the cheap. If you're willing to do the research, the world is literally at your fingertips to learn the In's and out's of being online.

Disadvantage: Getting on the web is one thing. Getting found by people searching for your product is quite another. Getting listed on page 158 on a Google search doesn't add up to sales. Unless your prepared to take on the full time job (and expense) of marketing your site, you will most likely only be found by people to whom you have personally given your web address. You will also need to have a payment and delivery method. And work out things like who pays shipping.

Conclusion: If at all possible, at least get a web page. Give people a convenient way to see your work and contact you by email. It's expected.

A Hosted Website

Showing your artwork on a hosted web site is a fairly fast and easy process.

Advantage: When you show your work on someone else's web site, you don't have to market your art or your website. It is relatively inexpensive. There are online companies that will 'host' your artwork and often for free or a small annual fee. Buyers are then directed to you; where you handle the sale and shipping, etcetera… Some of them even take care of accepting payment, shipping and returns if you sell prints of your art that they produce (for a fee of course). Luckily many are able to print on demand, so you don't have to 'buy' the print until someone places an order for it.

Disadvantage: The hosting site makes the bulk of their money by selling their services to you (hosting and producing prints), not by selling your original pieces of art. In other words, they do not target sales to a specific market of art buyers; but rather you, the Artist. You may have to provide your own digital capture. If you want to offer larger prints you will need to use high end capture methods (professional camera or scanner). The hosting company may also take a % of the sale for themselves.

Conclusion: It's a fantastic way to get your art 'on the web' without a lot of time or expense involved.

Art Shows & Galleries

Art shows are often hosted by galleries and organizations that can attract lots of interested buyers.

Advantage: The event is advertised by the host, so you don't have to. Art shows can be a great way to introduce yourself and your art to the local market (and possibly larger, if a licensing agent sees your work). You have the opportunity to sell your work or walk away with an award. Everybody loves an 'award winning' artist! Many Artists get their start via shows and galleries.

Disadvantage: You may not be accepted into the Show or you may have to pay to enter. Galleries are very particular about the work they carry. Once you are accepted, if you are accepted, you can expect the Gallery to take 40-60% commission right off the top. You must do your homework and deal with reputable galleries only.

Conclusion: The Internet is great, but it's impossible to beat the 'real thing' when it comes to viewing art. Viewing the original up close and personal is the true art experience. The high end sales are still made in the galleries. Go for it.

Sell Prints

Selling prints of your original art is easier today than ever before.

Advantage: You can sell prints of a popular piece at an affordable price. You can sell the original as well or choose to keep it in your own private collection. Fine art printing companies are widely available on the Internet and elsewhere. Many of them do digital capture as well as the printing itself. Depending on your budget, and quality of digital capture, you have control over the type and quality of the Giclee Prints created. You also have choice of selling limited or open edition prints.

Disadvantage: You have to invest in the digital capture and printing services and hope that you can re-coup those expenses through the various methods of selling your art.

Conclusion: Whether to sell prints or strictly one of a kind, originals is a personal decision. The advantages are obvious, yet for some, it goes against the grain. Follow your heart.

License Your Art with a Company

Your "license" is your permission for someone else to market and sell images of your work. How the image is used is agreed upon in the contract.

Advantage: Your art continues to work for you long after you have created it, generating a passive income.

Disadvantage: These companies usually license art only for their own use. Meaning the art is used strictly for that company's product.

Conclusion: Once you have a contract it is a no hassle way to sell your art. Be sure to sell your license, not your copyright!

License Your Art with a Commercial Licensing Agency

With this type of licensing your image is contracted out to manufacturing companies through the Agency. How the image is used is agreed upon in the contract. It could be used on anything from mugs, dishware, cloth, napkins, art prints, T-shirts stationary and any number of things in the manufacturing industry. Licensing art with an agency is the professionals' game.

Advantage: Once you create the original artwork and sign a licensing agreement, you can return to the art of creating great Fine Art, all the while earning passive income.

Disadvantage: The licensing market is highly competitive. Agents will only license what they believe they can sell because it literally costs them thousands of dollars to land good contracts with manufactures, publishers and various agencies. They need art they 'know' they can sell. Some licensing agents will ask you to put up a significant sum of 'good faith' money to help off set their expenses. Then you both cross your fingers that it sells. If the agent doesn't get paid, you don't get paid. You get 30-50% of the contract price the agent makes with the purchasing company; about 4-10% of the wholesale price of the product (not retail sale price).

Conclusion: Even at a fraction of the wholesale price, the profits can be huge. If you are talented enough to play that game, my hat goes off to you. Well done!

I am sure you have noticed these selling channels are interrelated. Many Artists will participate in event booths; selling prints, handing out business cards with their web address, drumming up commissioned work and developing a good 'word of mouth' reputation all at the same time! And why not? The more you put your work 'out there' the more chances you have to sell it. Whether you just dabble in art or make it your bread and butter, there are selling opportunities for you. Some obviously require more time and effort than others. The great part is, between the Internet and local organizations you can get as little or as deeply involved as you want. Keep it fun and enjoy yourself!

About the Author:

Cathy Robertson is an Artist and writer for Fine Art Castle. Have fun, informative decorating & design articles delivered to you! Sign up for our monthly Newsletter today at http://www.fineartcastle.com/decoratingtipsanddesign.aspx . Or stop by and take a peek at our Fine Art Prints for your Canvas Art decorating needs at http://www.fineartcastle.com

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - 10 Ways to Sell Your Art, an Overview of Selling Options

Guidelines on Writing a Good Artist Statement and Resume

July21
By Reinaldo Arvelo
 
 
 

Your art work should always be accompanied by an artist statement and resume if you are going to submit your work to a gallery. Your statement should be your defense and your voice. Your resume should be a brief collection of experiences, exposure, organizations, commissions, publications, or lectures. The importance of having both an artist statement and resume is essential for all beginning artists.

Your Artist Statement:

For your statement try not to be vague. Always explain "why" you say what you say. As an artist, I focus on three important details in my statement. Your influence, Your Process, and Your Intention. When writing about your art it is best to describe what your influences are. For example, if nature is your motivation than explain what are the influences that nature provides you. Your influences can be spiritual just as long as you explain why and what they are and how they influence you.

The way you execute your work is also an important topic in your statement. Your process should reflect with your influences. Do not confuse your work habit with your process. Focus on the evolution of the work itself. Why do you use that color? Why is it shaped that way? Keep in mind that your materials also play a big part in your statement. Even the surface you work on can play a big important aesthetic meaning or quality to your artwork.

Lastly, on writing a good artist statement, you should explain your intention. Give your defense on what you are trying to tell people about your work. Is you work to explain, stimulate, poke fun of, inform, or an opinion or maybe a belief. No matter what the intent it should represent you and your work. I usually end my statement with the intention because it answers the "why" process and the "what" influences that support it.

Your Artist Resume:

Your artist resume is simply a listing of your artistic career and experience. Even if you do not have much experience you can still be able put together a good resume. Start by writing down gallery shows you have been in and keep group shows and solo shows apart. What commissions, projects or art work you have sold? List any periodicals you have been in like magazines, books, and articles. Any organizations, clubs, or memberships you are a part of. Make sure to provide your information like an address, email and phone number to contact you. Also add your education. Below is a simple setup on how to put together your resume:

Name
Address
Phone
Email
website

Education

Solo Shows

Year, title of show, name of gallery, city and sate

Group Shows

Year, title of show, name of gallery, city and state

Commission / Projects

title of commission or project, who commissioned it, city and state

Awards

Articles

year, publication, title

Clubs and Organizations

Employment (optional)

Make sure you keep your statement and resume up to date.

http://www.artistneed.com is new site made for artists. With useful information, resources, tutorials, software, and books. Email them to be placed on their monthly newsletter.

Reinaldo Arvelo
You can also visit Arvelo's website at http://www.reinaldoarvelo.com

Artist Statements, Artist Biography Tips, And Resumes – Nuts and Bolts

July21

Artist Statements, Artist Biography Tips, And Resumes - Nuts and Bolts

By Barbara Bowen

 "If you aim for a market you'll miss the mark." Whoever said that, I'm a believer. It's no good looking over the shoulder at what strangers prefer before creating. True inspiration is the optimal motivator. Quality issues from there, and its purity taps the nerves of audience attraction. That said, there are far too many masterpieces tucked on shelves behind the light of day. Strong promotional tools may be secondary to our motivation, but they're essential. Like the apex of an iceberg, they show first. They introduce our work, foster credibility, and mirror how far we've traveled along the arc of our goals. Those we know may direct us to new connections. But even then, we must support those connections with an effective "portrait" of who we are. Selling is a part of every career. Never underestimate the power of presentation. Why not enter the new season prepared with an updated, incisive, authentic, and powerful one? What do you need? A dynamic artist statement, artist biography and artist resume is the beginning. Effective artist portfolios and proposals are also important. Start now and stay ahead of the pack. So, what are the important elements of these essential artist presentation tools?

Artist Statement: Shaping your essential bond with viewers and sales An artist statement communicates what motivates you as an artist. It's the most personal part of your presentation; an opportunity to bring your viewers and potential buyers closer. It offers a glimpse of the person behind the work. While keeping it informative, let your personality show. Share your ideas and concerns, and how they are revealed in your work. Explain to viewers what your work means to you, not what it's supposed to mean to them. They will arrive at their own conclusions. It's okay to mention influences, but mostly keep prominent names associated with your career for your resume, where they will serve as testimonial and avoid the appearance of boasting. Give some details about your techniques and how they help you achieve your vision. Then, you might add a segment about how your approach is unique. Most general artist statements are around one page or less. Brevity sustains attention, so I lean toward three or four concise paragraphs. In some situations, a statement about a particular artwork may be requested. A statement can act as a marketing piece in certain commercial situations, which may be appropriate. So be sure to tailor your artist statement to its purpose.

Artist Biography: Creating a memorable snapshot of your career life An artist bio contains similar information to the artist resume but is presented in paragraph form, is less formal, and is most often written in the third person. It serves to highlight the information presented on your resume. It's a great way to convey a "snapshot" of your career experience.

Artist Resume: Detailing your career with clarity and professionalism Artist resumes detail the accomplishments, endeavors, and knowledge. They offer a full picture of your career, and the categories featured on the resume will depend upon your artistic discipline. It's important to update your resume on a regular basis, adding and deleting the listed activities, as appropriate. An artist resume can be one to four pages in length. Most artists have two versions prepared: a longer and shorter version. It's often best to use a professional paper stock, in white or ivory. The style of type varies, and can add to the resume's professionalism.

Artist Proposal: Standing out from the crowd with dynamic writing/shaping/editing Artists also use their portfolio to apply for specific projects, funding programs, residencies, or other competitive opportunities. These applications may ask you to submit a project description, details on your approach to the project, and a cover letter. These written materials should be tightly edited and tailored to the particular opportunity. Be passionate and sincere in the presentation of your work, and always conclude with thanking the panel, juror, and/or organization for their time and consideration. Typical questions for you to answer will be: Why are you an ideal applicant? How will you benefit the program or project? What technical qualifications, abilities, or personal assets can you contribute? How will you benefit from the opportunity? How would the project advance your career as an artist? How would you use the money awarded?

Visual Artist Portfolio: Keeping the heart and soul of your work evolving Your portfolio is the most valuable tool in your overall presentation. Your visuals are worth a thousand words, and an arresting portfolio can help close the gap, should your written materials be less developed, as in young artist on the career path. There are many approaches to a portfolio, depending upon the discipline. One universal ingredient to a successful portfolio is a sense of continuity. The transitions between and within subject matter must cohere. Color, tone, shape, scale, all must be considered when choosing what images to include and how to position them. This process involves subjectivity as well as objectivity. Most artists benefit greatly from feedback from a trained eye, and reactions from untrained eyes can also be helpful. A portfolio is most successful when modified and tailored, with acumen, for its particular audience. Many artists now supplement their physical portfolio with a digital version either on the Web or presented on CD-ROM or DVD. Stay current on new formats and choose the method(s) that feature your work most powerfully and support your marketing goals.

*Article by Barbara Bowen, founder of: http://www.GatewaysCoaching.com - - the definitive source for Creativity Coaching and http://www.GatewaysToAction.blogspot.com

Email Barbara your questions about creativity coaching and creating dynamic artist statements, bios, resumes and proposals. Learn about creative action projects through her Web sites. She would love to hear from you.*

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