Artist Statement

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Artist Statement Samples

July22

Here is a constantly updated list of links to sample artist statements from all over.

Here is a constantly updated list of links to sample artist statements from all over.
Here is a constantly updated list of links to sample artist statements from all over.

  • Need editor – i'm an artist in LES looking for a writer who can edit an artist statement and a bio for me. Doesn't need to be super elaborate but has to be professional sounding.
    newyork.craigslist.org/mnh/wrg/3212996036.html
  • Dream House Installation Artist Statement | amy barrett – Dream House Installation Artist Statement. Published . at 1024 × 682 in Dream House · ← Previous Next → · Dream House Installation Artist Statement
    amybarrett.wordpress.com/…/dream-house-installation-artist-st…
  • – “What is an artist? A provincial who finds himself somewhere between a physical reality and a metaphysical one….It's this in-between that I'm calling a province,
    www.pandorapillsbury.com/about/artist-statement/
  • Dan Deacon: America – review
    In his artist's statement Deacon makes the point that touring in Europe for the first time made him feel truly American, despite being the sort of American who habitually eschews the corporatism and apple pie. He's part of Baltimore's Wham City arts
    See all stories on this topic »

    The Guardian
  • ARTIST STATEMENT ArnoldArtist StatementSince my preliminary year, my work has involved symbolic patterns of traditional and modernSamoan body art. In year 11 I began sketching
    www.docstoc.com/docs/…/ARTIST-STATEMENT—Arnold
  • What do you think of this painting and artist statement Concerning – Peregrine Honig, 'Bed of Roses'Artist's statement: I came to "Bed of Roses" because my body and wo.
    www.cafemom.com/…/What_do_you_think_of_this_painting…
  • ARTIST STATEMENT – Threesquared – Emily Clayton: Studio Warmups. ARTIST STATEMENT. Studio Warmups began as an exploration of what transpires inside verses outside of the studio. While in
    www.threesquaredgallery.com/…/CLAYTON-ARTIST%20ST…
  • Artist Statement | Denise PhilipbarArtist Statement. My work is about transformation. I love to make objects out of unexpected materials that become recognizable only upon closer inspection.
    denisesart.com/?page_id=25
  • Suda House: Artist Statement: Aquarella – "The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. She to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no
    www.dnjgallery.net/popup_shouse_statement.html
  • bryan holland arts: artist statementARTIST STATEMENT: Recently, I began working on a series of animal portraits based on photos that I'd taken at zoos or museums. These are combined with a
    www.bryanholland.com/artist-statement.html
  • Seattle artist debuts mural painting camp – The Civil Wars – Barton Hollow – Music Videoby artists846,111 views · Artist's Statement 1:54. Watch Later Artist's Statementby charlotteyoung248,595 views · Autistic Artist 5:17. Watch Later Autistic Artistby scvw79351,351 views · Neil Gaiman
    See all stories on this topic »
  • Iranian-American Artist Eric Parnes Dreams of “Jeannie” in His Middle Eastern
    Parnes, whose work often applies Iranian iconography, text, textile, and ceramic patterns to incongruous mass-produced objects like soccer balls, deck chairs, or cars, coined the term “Neo Orientalism™” to describe what he calls in his artist's
    See all stories on this topic »

    ARTINFO
  • CD: Dan Deacon – America
    Dan Deacon's 'America' is mostly oblique and observational. America comes with an artist statement where Deacon says “I never felt American until I left the United States”. His third album digs into his “frustration, fear and anger towards the county
    See all stories on this topic »

    The Arts Desk
  • Bonny Zanardi: 16 artists share 'FourSquared' show at Arc Gallery – In her artist statement she notes that portraits, the major part of her work, "incarnate the most representative archetypes of human condition." "From spirituality to propaganda, from lust to virtue, from loneliness to seduction, they become strong
    See all stories on this topic »
  • Video: Christian Siriano's Spooky, Sexy New Collection – Siriano said the collection was inspired by “bats and film noir,” and according to his artist's statement, “These flying demons of the night intrigue me with their creepy, dark, and dramatic presence…the intricate details of the veins and bone
    See all stories on this topic »
  • Buffalo River Photography Exhibit on Display at Cantrell Gallery
    “I have spent over 40 years hiking along the Buffalo and its surrounding mountains and valleys," says Caldwell in an artist's statement. "I have enjoyed this part of Arkansas probably more than any other part of the state. With these photographs I hope
    See all stories on this topic »

    In Arkansas
  • Roberta Trentin Photography: Artist StatementArtist Statement. All of my projects, ideas, and moments of creativity come from an encounter — not necessarily a physical rendezvous, but a coming together of
    robertatrentin.com/Statement.html
  • Artist Statement | NEW "Visions of Bay View: The Exhibit"Artist Statement Eveyline Hall 1890, BAY VIEW #1/1 Cottage on Glendale Ave., BAY VIEW #5 The Music Box Cottage circa 1890 Porch Culture IX & Woman's
    www.robertclevelandphoto.com/…/artist-statement-49_1_460….
  • artist statement (PDF) – Lucas DickersonArtist Statement. When I begin a series of work I come to a piece with a vague idea of what I hope to achieve, and immediately start working. After I have
    www.lucasdickerson.com/…/Dickerson_Lucas_ArtistStatement…

Why Bother with Art Colleges?

July21
Author: John Morris

If you are pretty talented at art you might not even consider going to Art College. Why should you, anyway? You can draw like the masters: Boticelli, Michaelangeo, Da Vinci. There wasn't a landscape scene your brushes didn't like, and there wasn't any portrait you couldn't draw. You can sketch anything that exists!

But as with any talent, you must have realized that this is one big world we live in. There is always room for improvement, and although your work might speak for itself, a degree behind you may be just what employers are looking for. Therefore, you muster all your reserves; you pack your easel, your brushes, and your palette and head north to the nearest art college.

1. Good choice?

Art school will definitely benefit you as an artist. Your innate talent will benefit from the proven concepts and techniques you can learn here. It may be that you already know the basics and the techniques of your art. Rest assured that there are always things the art school can teach you that you won't already know.

Art school also develops in its students a love and appreciation for the different forms of art. It opens to the student new vistas of learning and expressing. Even if only for that reason, Art school would be worth every penny.

2. Who Is Art School Suited For?

Artists are a rare kind. They seem to be able to create masterpieces without complicated theories and computations. It's as if they are moved by instinct to draw, paint, and create visually pleasing artworks. Some artists, when asked about their artwork, would simply shrug and say they didn't know what motivated them, and they just felt like painting it. Art school should not aim to correct this freewheeling style of artistry. It should, however, provide the basic techniques and theories on art and creativity. Instead of suppressing natural skill, it should develop and enlighten it by explaining the concepts behind art. Unlike what most people think, there truly is a science behind art.

Artists sometimes just create art. But after Art College, they come to a realization of theories behind what they have done by instinct. Fundamental theories can only improve and supplement the talent students have.

3. What to Learn?

When choosing an Arts College, look into the nature of its programs.

- Is it solely a graphic design school or does it offer courses in other specific areas?

- Does the school provide any statistics or downloadable documents outlining the percentage of its graduates that are now working in their chosen field?

4. Specialize!

Remember that the subject of art is not just a big blob with the label art. It is composed of numerous subcategories and specializations. You need to choose a specialization because if you don't, your skills will be diffused trying to learn the many branches of art. Try to improve the most at the area of your interest. It could be painting, sculpture, digital arts or others.

5. Be The Best

Also, look into whether the school participates in any graphical arts competitions or has accomplished anything of renown in the industry. This is a sure sign of their commitment to the arts and the education of its students. One of the best things one can get out of Art College is exposure to competition and industry standards. Such competition pushes one from being complacent. If you are to be a better artist, you should never be satisfied with what you already know. You should grab the opportunity to learn new and exciting things.

6. Conclusion

Your education might be the most important investment you make in your life. Without proper training, your chances at success are greatly diminished. A proper Art college will certainly train you and equip you with the tools needed to make it big in your profession.

About the Author:
For more great art education related articles and resources check out http://www.artschoolstop.com

Article Source: Why Bother with Art Colleges?

Why Every Artist Needs a Blog & How to Create an Artist Blog

July21
Author: Kristin Royce

As an artist, the key to selling more artwork is maximizing its exposure. The internet is an increasingly popular tool for promoting original art, and if done properly, can be quite profitable.

One of the most effective (and free!) online marketing tools for artists is the blog. Artist blogs provide an easy way to display your art, discuss your creative process, post exhibition announcements and more. Best of all, blogs require no working knowledge of HTML and the search engines love their dynamic content.

What is a blog and how will it sell my art?

A "blog" is a web-based diary or journal. The author of a blog, also known as a "Blogger", publishes content on a regular basis about a focused topic. These regular postings typically provide a "community" feel by allowing site visitors to post feedback to your journal entries. This mode of communication can deepen relationships with potential art buyers, leading to increased sales.

Blogs also have the ability to archive all of your previous posts, dynamically creating an individual page for each journal entry. The feature is great for art buyers using search engines to find original art. For example, if you have a blog post describing a painting that you just completed of the Golden Gate Bridge at sunset and an art buyer in Florida goes to Google and searches for "painting of Golden Gate Bridge at sunset", there is a very good chance that your blog entry will appear pretty high in the rankings. Cha Ching!!

Many artists have felt the pain of email marketing losing its effect due to spam filters, junk email overloads and virus paranoia. Blogs provide a new way to communicate with clients, fans and industry professionals. This trend can support your email marketing efforts by allowing blog subscription options for site visitors so that they are notified whenever your blog is updated along with providing a permanent place on the web for all of your postings as opposed to newsletter emails that are typically deleted.

How to start a blog

Blog Publishing Tools

To begin, visit some of these free blogging sites, all offering unique template options that even an artist can appreciate, image uploads and syndication ability.

Blogger.com (Simple to set up and multiple authoring ability) MSN Spaces (Create your own mini site, with an exceptional blogging feature) Live Journal (Requires a bit of 'blogging knowledge' to get it set up) Blog Drive

If you're interesting in reviewing additional blog features, these sites require a small monthly fee to maintain.

Typepad (starts at $4.95/month)

Tripod Blogs (starts at $4.95/month)

Note to artists with MySpace accounts: MySpace provides members personal blogs, but it is important to know that MySpace blogs are not currently listed in search engines, which as noted above, is one of the main reasons to get a blog. While MySpace works to remedy this issue, it is recommended that you blog using a tool that is accessible to search engine spiders.

Decide on a title for your blog

The title of your blog should be brief and to the point. You can get creative with your language in the blog description / tag line. A focused title will help with higher search engine rankings and make it clear to visitors what the blog is about.

For example, the title for ThePauper.com blog is " Diary of a Pauper . The blog description is Rants and raves about the careers and lives of starving artists." The title is concise, stating exactly what it is, while the description is a bit more creative.

Blog theme

It's important to establish yourself as a professional working artist if you want to use your blog as a vehicle to sell your art. Blog theme involves the layout and color of the page, quality of the artwork images displayed and verbiage used for blog postings. Select your blog template carefully and make a habit to review your blog from the perspective of a potential client. Is the page visually appealing? Do the images of your artwork provide a link to an extra large version to see detail? Does your content have a consistent theme? Here's a good example of a working blog by mix engineer, Ken Lewis: http://protoolsmixing. com/blog.html The content theme is exceptionally consistent, plus the colors and page layout match his website.

What to write

What's beautiful about blogs is that there are no rules on what to write, but if you want to attract and keep an audience, you might consider some of these suggestions.

Keep your posts creative and interesting. Move and inspire your readers by being completely honest about your creative process.

Use keywords in your blog title and post. Using the example mentioned earlier - if your post is about a Golden Gate Bridge painting, be sure to use that exact phrase in the title and body of your blog. Think about what people might type into search engines to find your content and then use those keywords in your blog. This technique will help increase the ranking of your web page on search engines.

Post daily , or at least twice a week. If you publish blog entries frequently, you will see more return visitors, subscriptions to your blog and comments from site visitors.

Proofread and preview your blog entries before posting. Some blog HTML editors have a way of creating weird symbols out of certain characters and a quick spell-check never hurts. (Note: be sure to create your blog entries using Word or some other text editor. Many blogging tools tend to "time out" after a certain amount of time and you could potentially lose hours of work.)

Publish your blog Finally! Your blog looks great and has unique content. Now, depending on the blogging tool that you selected, follow the steps to publish it to the World Wide Web. Test the live URL that now houses your blog. If all of your graphics appear correctly and the copy is flawless, then you want to make sure that you promote your blog on your personal website, in your email signature and by word of mouth.

Using the tools you already have to spread the word while testing your dedication to frequent posting is the best way to get started. Part 2 of will unveil tons of ways to promote your blog online

About the Author:
Kristin Royce is a search engine optimization and online marketing professional contributing online marketing and promotional content for artists to The ARTrepreneur E-Zine. The ARTrepreneur offers articles helping artists focus on proven techniques to accomplish any goal. Read More: http://www.theartrepreneur.com

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Why Every Artist Needs a Blog & How to Create an Artist Blog

The Inner Critic Kidnaps the Artist Soul

July21
Author: Valery Satterwhite

Copyright (c) 2009 Valery Satterwhite

"Re-examine all you have been told. Dismiss what insults your Soul." - Walt Whitman

For many artists, challenges are very personal. And one of the biggest challenges is the Critic in the room, the Inner Critic. This gnarly Inner Critic is the voice of your self-doubt and fear. It is the emotional ties that bind you, hold you back, keep you stuck, limit you in what you think is possible for you as an artist. This Inner Critic will critique and beat you up more than any audience or perceived expert ever will. If allowed, this Inner Critic will suck the life force right out of you.

"Being true to yourself is what feeds creativity, not self-doubt and criticism." - Diane Arenberg

Why? Because it is a very frightened little creature. It acts nasty as a defense mechanism. What it really wants to do is crawl under a bankie with a sippy cup where it's safe; where no one will bother him.

There are many 'not safe' zones for the Inner Critic. Here are a three:

1. Starting big project that you have never done before. (What if I fail?) 2. Having a bigger presence in the public eye than it has now. (It's only a matter of time before they find out I'm not really that good.) 3. Rejection. (If they reject my art, then they reject me, and I will cease to be relevant - or even exist.)

Fear that you're not being, or won't be, acknowledged as an artist will hold you back. Fear that you're not good enough compared with other artists will choke your expression. This fear may lead to anger, bitterness and even depression. Since you're art is an expression of you, this fearful held-back state of beingness will be reflected in your art. There is a vast difference between deliberately illustrating and expressing pain, desperation, and other negative emotions and holding yourself back in your artistic expression as a result of pain, desperation and other negative emotions.

Here are some acronyms for the word FEAR (F.E.A.R.):

Finding Excuses And Reasons - Are you procrastinating?

False Evidence Appearing Real - Are you blaming other people or circumstances for being stuck your lack of success?

False Emotions Appearing Real - Are you beating up on yourself for not being 'good' enough? Here's a clue: If you're feeling 'down' then there's a good chance you're beating up on yourself.

And my personal favorite (drum roll please)

Fuck Everything And Run - Are you thinking about quitting, giving up on your pursuits as an artist?

You can deny your dreams but the outcome will be quiet desperation. The desperation becomes the safe comfort zone. You're Inner Critic will fight hard to keep you where it feels safe. You may not like the desperate comfort zone that you find yourself in but it's what you know. Safe. No surprises.

"To see far is one thing. Going there is another." - Brancusi

If you find that your in a state of FEAR there is a little trick you can apply to help you crawl out of that dark hole. You can ask yourself the following two questions:

1. What am I getting out of staying in this state? You don't do anything unless you get something out of it. What is staying right where you are in your artistic process allowing you to do?

2. Who would I be; what would I do; what would I have without this fear? Use your imagination to visualize that life. Run with it! Breathe it in.

The only thing standing between you and want you want to create for your art and your life experience is you. It's time to get out of your own way. Or, head down to Wal-Mart and get yourself a nice bankie and sippy cup. Get several. You'll be snuggled in, warm and comfy, for a long time.

"Remember, with every doubt comes a hitch in the natural flow of being." - Ian Factor

About the Author:

Valery Satterwhite is the Founder of the International Association for Inner Wizards. She teaches artists of all kinds how to get out of their own way, eliminate personal and professional roadblocks, so they can fully express their artistic vision and succeed in the business of art. Empower the Wizard Within, tame the Inner Critic, unleash and Inspire the Muse. Get Free Artist Resource Directory today at http://www.InnerWizard.com.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - The Inner Critic Kidnaps The Artist Soul

What your Music Profile Should Say About you

July21
Author: Artistopia Staff

Your online music profile is the bottom-line essential information on WHO you are as a band, singer, songwriter and/or musician. Your profile, as to how it fits in the big picture at Artistopia, an artist development site for indie and unsigned artists, is your biography or resume that presents you to the music industry, other musicians, and your potential fans. That makes it a very important page on the Internet, right? It needs to be interesting, well-written, informative and to-the-point, for this is you marketing yourself. When writing this document, there is much to consider to make it presentable.

Consider these scenarios:
1
2

In the Internet world, any webmaster will tell you content is king. Why? Because it is how online visitors find you. The number one source for driving traffic to web pages are search engines, and it is content they want and nothing else. (Content is literally text, characters, paragraphs, sentences – it's information.) You can easily improve the traffic to your profile by entering as much relevant content about yourself as is necessary to describe your music, history, act, image, and musical goals.

Knowing this and knowing that in this busy-busy click-happy Web world, you have to have your band description clearly stated at the top of the bio! The rest of the fill-in details are at the bottom. If you have captured the readers attention at the top, they will follow through and read more. Otherwise, they will leave your profile and look for another band that presents themselves better than you did.

The best place to start is by creating an outline, in Word (or other program). Know how many total characters you can use in the field you are entering information in. Use spell-check and save it for later updating. Collect your thoughts and make notes about your background, your musical history, goals, accomplishments, band members, who plays which instrument, etc.

* The music business is a BUSINESS so present yourself professionally.

The first paragraph should be an introduction. It is the lead-in to who you are, what your music specialty is (genre), where in the world you are from, and perhaps an enthusiastic quote given to you about your music. If you sound like a certain pro band or artist, what makes you different from them?

* Busy industry people may not finish reading after a few lines if the opener does not capture them quickly. And you have to live up to the hype you dish out!

The second paragraph could cover what you are currently up to musically. Here you might mention a new release you are working on, or music projects you are involved with. What promotional plans do you have to support your current activities? Mentioning an upcoming tour or gig would be good here.

The third paragraph will include band member information (who plays what) or brief mention of background experiences, instrumentation, and/or accomplishments, that accentuates your artistic development. Artistopia offers locations for detailed information on these entries, so use the available space to present yourself wisely.

The Mission Statement section will cover your music career goals and is aimed at the industry professionals that might be searching for your particular talent. The Influences section will be who your musical influences are, so there is no need to waste the readers time mentioning them elsewhere.

You have to remember, A&R reps, labels, producers, potential collaborators, are all very busy people that have heard it all before. Do not waste words but find a way to stand out from the typical. The music you create may bring them to your profile after they heard it to learn more about you, so it is up to you to show them that you are a person that they can work with.

It is absolutely amazing to see artists that don't take the time to do this. In countless web travels and thousands of music profiles, you see artist descriptions from as short as a one-liner like "We want to be heard," to certain social site artist descriptions that go for MILES. There is a big difference in giving the reader vital information that should be included your profile and info that no one will ever care about that should not.

Therein is the essence of what your music profile should be saying about you.

About the Author:

Artistopia - The Ultimate Artist Development Resource http://www.artistopia.com is an artist development and community on the web providing indie and unsigned music artists, songwriters and bands all the tools needed for music business collaboration and networking.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - What your Music Profile Should Say About you

What is an Artist’s Statement & How Often Should It Be Updated?

July21

 by: Yasmeen Abdur-Rahman

An artist's statement is a statement of ideas and thoughts that describe your philosophy, vision, and passion towards your artistic creations.

Ponder over the following questions prior to writing your artist's statement:

  • Is your work whimsical, thought provoking, or edgy?
  • Does it portray a series of stories?
  • Whom or what has influenced you the most?
  • How is your work meaningful to you?

How do you begin to write your artists statement? You could begin by writing a quote that has inspired you and your work, or you could create a strong sentence that summarizes your philosophy about your life and how art has changed your views on life in general. You could also include what type of style and technique that motivates you the most while creating your art creation.

Some artists have writer's block when it comes to putting down their thoughts on paper. I would suggest that you start with words that best describe your art and inner thoughts then go back to edit them into definite statements. Most artists know and feel what they are trying to convey to their audience, however, writing it down becomes a huge task.

Personally, I believe your artist's statement should be written by yourself because of the personal touch you would be able to provide to it. No one knows better about your artistry other than yourself. Your audience will get a feel of what your inner thoughts are and how you find this passion to be a lifestyle and not a hobby.

Make sure you aren't using too many words that only artists would recognize. Express yourself while allowing your words to flow. You are expressing your passion; so don't feel pressured to become a renounced writer.

While being an artist is a rewarding career, unfortunately, there are people outside of this industry who would say it is a hobby. So, it is very important to express how you feel about your craft through your artist's statement. Writing a one-page statement would be sufficient in getting your statement across to your audience, but if it runs to a page two, that's fine. Clearly, it shows your audience that you are vividly and precisely getting your thoughts across.

Your artist's statement should be updated as your career inspires new direction and when there are profound events that have captured new inspirations in your creative vision. Your statement could be updated at the same pace similar to updating your résumé.

If you're still unsure how to get started, here are two excellent sites that have sample statements: www.mollygordon.com or www.naia-artists.org

Your artist's statement is a very important tool. Take a block of time out of your daily or weekly schedules to create the type of statement that will allow your audience to understand how you began your journey.

Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/business_and_finance/article_707.shtml

About The Author
Yasmeen Abdur-Rahman, Virtual Assistant & Lifestyle Entrepreneur Coach, is the owner of a home-based business called 'The Brownstone Workshop.' If you need your artist support materials (ASMs) professionally created and updated along with other administrative, ad hoc services, or lifestyle coaching, call on Yasmeen at (919) 319-6271, via e-mail yasmeen033@aol.com or via website: http://www.thebrownstoneworkshop.bigstep.com

The Challenge of Writing an Artist’s Statement That is Artistic and Deep But Also Makes Sense

July21

By Kathy Ostman-Magnusen

Often, while viewing other artists experiences with their creativity, defined by pen to paper within their "Artist's Statements", I find myself thinking, "This reminds me of man trying to define God by putting creativity into a box." Oft times too I wonder, "What the heck are they talking about? I wonder if even 'they' even know."

I have met all kinds of artists. I always hope that I will share some kind of phenomenon with fellow artists, of an unmistakable vibration we both generate and feed off of. I hope that our connection will cause us to reach new heights and feel compelled to go home and create great things. I rarely come across artists like that, they are as different from one another as anyone.

I really do believe there is an 'energy' within art, colors, and it is that energy about a piece of art that people resonate to.. or not. Some only like only my precise artwork, of which I feel are renderings and not in my personal opinion, 'true art'. It tells me that we are not connected in a 'spiritual' sense. We connect on other levels though so consequences of that kind of thinking are not something that needs to be brooded over, on the outside chance you find my opinion offensive or objectionable.

I think a lot of 'art talk' is mumbo jumbo, and is as redundant and boring as the latest football player explaining how his team is going to win the next game. Yet, I also think there is a need for the artist to describe the connection they feel with their art. Doing that, helps the viewer to enter their world, as well as the artist to understand 'what the heck happened' to cause them to create what they did.

Creativity is elusive, but the more we enter that gate, the more we find ourselves in the presence of something truly remarkable. I think the vibration of colors, coupled with the spirit of the dance of creative action, can be found in all kinds of art and no one has the market on that. Once in a great while we come across genius like Leonardo da Vinci and we stand in awe. Because of miraculous adventures of the soul, in any genre, it is our responsibility to pursue the unknown. Leonardo da Vinci only scratched the surface. Pursuing the vibrations of the elusive is often an alone experience. It is within that 'prayer' of sorts that mystics are uncovered. There are many ways of doing it though, as there are religions, so I don't think anyone has the key to it all.

So how do you do it? How do you write an "Artist's Statement" that makes sense? First define who you are within your work in your own mind. If you do not know, you won't be able to write anything at all that others will comprehend. Be careful of the mumbo jumbo, but write out your heart as you look at your work. You may just discover a part of yourself you had not met before. Take your time, discover who you are. Remember da Vinci as well, nothing he did was done without extreme confrontation of what it was he was looking to explore, so laziness is not acceptable. Right? Yes!

ABOUT Kathy Ostman-Magnusen: I am an artist, represented by Monkdogz Urban Art, New York. ORIGINAL ART may be purchased through Monkdogz: http://www.monkdogz.com/chelseagallery/artistart/Magnusen/artist_magnusen.htm

My newest website: http://www.kathyostman-magnusen.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kathy_Ostman-Magnusen
http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Challenge-of-Writing-an-Artists-Statement-That-is-Artistic-and-Deep-But-Also-Makes-Sense&id=2424623

Overcoming Artist’s Block (part 2)

July21

By Gail Miller

Once you are ready to start working again you will know it instinctively. All artists go through periods of 'creative block' - it's normal, but after one such episode there are ways of stimulating ideas and getting the creative juices flowing again.

Visit your local library and take out books that cover materials, techniques and subjects that are not familiar to you. If you are a watercolour artist, why not try oils for once? If you paint large acrylic abstracts, would it be possible to try soft pastels on a smaller scale? What results could you achieve by doing something completely different to what you're used to?

What about trying collage or mixed media work? Take photos of your neighbourhood, family or friends. Local places of interest, the countryside, the seashore, the city. Manipulate your photos on your PC and print out as digital art. Use the images, either natural or manipulated as collage pieces. It is so therapeutic cutting pieces and sticking them down. Use a range of materials to finish your work.

Instead of going straight back to paintings or drawings on normal scale, why not create some miniature pieces? How about greetings cards? White card 'blanks' are very easy to source. How delighted family, friends or customers would be to own an unique hand painted card.

Try drawing for once instead of painting, if that's your usual medium, or vice versa. Fill a sketchbook with small quick sketches. You could even time yourself. Three or five minutes maximum for each sketch.

When you're ready to go full size again, try loosening up your technique, by again setting a time limit for each piece of work you create. With a deadline to meet, you will speed up and loosen up. Try not to be precious with your art. Be quick and bold - see what happens.

Paint upside down. Start a new piece, then half way through turn the paper or canvas round 90 degrees. This is a great technique for abstracts. Use new colours - let them flow into each other. Splatter colours onto the wet surface. If you like, you could turn the work once more to finish. What a great way to create 'happy accidents'.

Paint or draw to music. Use only your emotion to make marks on the surface of your support. Play your favourite rock, pop or classical music, let the melodies and rhythms wash over you, influencing how your artwork evolves. I often paint to 'Smile' by Brian Wilson .... and boy do I get inspired!

What about painting left handed if you're a right-hander and vice versa. Trying to do a representational work with your weakest side will produce art that is still yours, but will have a completely different edge to it. Challenging and great fun to do ... if you have the discipline!

Finally, once you get back into full flow, remind yourself of all the artwork you have created successfully. How appreciated you are by your customers. Read their testimonials. Feel that glow again, when you realise that your creativity block was only temporary and that there are fans out there just waiting for you to release some wonderful new artwork into the arena.

Gail Miller is a professional artist whose artwork is a visual feast of colour and fun. Her fascination with bold colours and fluid, expressive shapes and line are evident in funky abstracts, sinuous nudes, vibrant still life paintings and lively townscapes. Visit her website at http://www.gailmiller.com

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Overcoming Artist’s Block (Part 1)

July21

By Gail Miller

How many times does an artist stare down at that blank piece of paper thinking "What on earth do I paint - Where do I put my first mark?" More often than you would imagine! It happens to all creative people actually, from visual artists, designers, poets, through to musicians and writers.

When this situation arises, you are in the grip of creative block. When you wrack your brains to come up with ideas but just can't seem to. There may be contributing factors to this state, such as tiredness, depression, environmental, physiological or psychological issues. On the other hand you could just be experiencing a period of simple low creativity.

When this happens there are a few things you can do to restore your creativity levels at will, however what you must not do is worry or fret about it. If the worst comes to the worse and you don't seem to be able to produce any work, simply regard the period as a 'holiday' or a rest. Your creativity level WILL rise again. In the meantime, utilise the time spent not creating to do positive things anyway.

Research other artists' work. Visit galleries or surf the net and see what other people are doing. Join artists' chat rooms or visit message boards or forums where you can exchange ideas and views with other artists. Just talking to other creative people can give you a real buzz! You might even make some new friends in the process.

Spend the time you are not actually producing art, by increasing your marketing efforts. Send postcards to galleries, research upcoming local art fairs or events where you could possibly take a booth to sell your art. Have some leaflets or brochures printed up all about yourself and your work. Take a couple of days out of your schedule and do a local neighbourhood leaflet drop.

Update your website or online portfolio. You may think it's already perfect but it's not often that things can't be improved or sharpened in some way. Update your artist's statement; put new 'zing' into your descriptions.

If you really can't face doing anything concerning your own artwork, visit the theatre, go to a pop concert, browse local museums. Go to a restaurant or coffee bar with friends and have a (non art related) natter.

Use the time to take a complete break, if this is what works best for you. You will instinctively know when the time is right to 'go back' to your art. When this happens there are lots of techniques you can use to get back into the swing of high creativity. These I explore in my article 'Overcoming Artist's Block (part 2)'.

Gail Miller is a professional artist whose artwork is a visual feast of colour and fun. Her fascination with bold colours and fluid, expressive shapes and line are evident in funky abstracts, sinuous nudes, vibrant still life paintings and lively townscapes. Visit her website at http://www.gailmiller.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Gail_Miller
http://EzineArticles.com/?Overcoming-Artists-Block-(Part-1)&id=12036

What Stands Between You and Your Artist Statement?

July21
By Ariane Goodwin
Is it a dry creek bed, or the Grand Canyon? A closed door, or the Chase Manhattan Bank vault? Or maybe, it's the whisper of many doubts: Artist statements are so predictably icky. What can you say about your work that someone else can't simply see? What's the point of words for a visual experience? How am I going to be authentic, but not arrogant? Sincere, but not sentimental?

And yet, you know that pros consider artist statements an essential part of a good portfolio (or About Me pages essential to a web site). Gallery owners are relieved by your professionalism. People who love your work will know more about you. Offering your audience more ways to connect with you increases their delight, as well as the perceived value of your work. But, goodness, all those daunting words between here and there!

For artists, words are a completely different experience from the tactile world of art making. Paper and paint inhabit the world of our senses, while words remain the detached curios of our mind. If we're an Independent Professional, we want to reserve center stage for our business. Once in a while, when the two worlds of work and words connect, language entices our senses and engages our imaginations, and we love it.

So what stops us from using words to describe our art? Tell about ourselves? These are the same words that have been with us since we could walk. What causes us to be deeply suspicious of language, one of our fundamental connections to being human?

The answer, in part, relates to a fatal combination of art critics and education. Art critics use language as scepters of judgment. If words are the messengers that determine our self-worth, then by all means, kill the messenger. Formal education uses language as bastions of control. If we are told when, where and how we can, or cannot, use which words, we grow to mistrust our relationship to language. The mistrust smolders underground, mostly unnoticed, until our words are thrust into a container, like the artist statement or About Me/Us web page.

Suddenly, words make us visible targets for judgment and criticism, so we hide our discomfort at this possibility with what we consider rational responses. "My work speaks for itself." "Statements are inconsequential to my work." "I have nothing to say that my work doesn't already convey." And the list goes on.

An opportunity, like writing a personal or artist statement, often causes us to second guess every idea we ever had about our work. We convince ourselves that we have nothing, really, to say, or for certain, nothing of value. Our first instinct is to either turn off the light and head out of the studio or office, or pump up our peacock feathers.

But running away only confirms our unspoken fear: there must be something to run away from. And pumping up encourages us to use flimsy or pretentious words to smother over our mistrust of language. This, in turn, fuels our perception that language related to our work is simply ludicrous.

Luckily, there is an alternative. Try pretending, that you have a lot to say, which is neither self-important nor trivial, but relevant and revealing. Imagine that all of your objections have been met and you are simply going to write whatever you believe to be true, at the moment, about your relationship to your work. Because, the good news is: you can recover your own words.

Why and how do you do what you do?

There is an unselfconscious language about your work, which you use all the time. Every time you talk or think about your work, you create a relationship between words and your chosen passion. The trick is to learn how to catch yourself doing this, and then faithfully write it down. Yup, I said: write it down. How else will you engage that part of your brain for continued support and help?

But why bother at all?

Because an artist statement or personal statement builds a compelling bridge between you and your audience. An inspiring statement gives the people who see your work another reason to remember you. It's reinforcement, clean and simple. And there's not an artist or independent professional around who can't use a little extra reinforcement to make it's way through the crowd.

Equally important, a statement gives you the opportunity to see what you do through the eyes of language, to validate your creation and profession from a new perspective. Really, you can't lose! You can only procrastinate.

Want to get started? Try this:

--TAKE care: Treat your statement with the same care that your treat your work; after all, all of it is you.

--GATHER raw materials: Use a notebook that is lovely or practical and keep it with you in the studio, in the car, in the office, beside your bed and take a few weeks to catch any fleeting thoughts that come to you about your work. Give your self permission to gather. Selecting and sorting comes later, when you have enough in your basket. Find a writing pen or pencil that flows smoothly across the surface. Make it a tacticle pleasure.

--TIME: Make a specific date with yourself. Respect this time. Do not tolerate interruptions.

--PREPARE your internal space: Close your eyes and conjure up your worst critic. In your mind's eye, lead this person out of the room. Give them another task, besides breathing over your shoulder, say, climbing a tree, skipping stones, or going to the local library. Tell your critic not to come back until you are ready. Critics are terrified of being abandoned, that's why they are so tenacious, so reassure yours that there will be a place set just for them at the editing and revision table. Critics are also stubborn. You may have to do this more than once.

--WRITE more than one: Like different works of art, a statement also thrives on change and rising out of "the moment." What suits this month's work may not work for the next month. Independent professionals need to revisit their intentions from time to time, and writing a new personal statement gets the juices flowing.

--GIVE yourself permission to make mistakes: Let yourself write badly. Crumple up lots of paper balls and throw them in a corner. It's the beginner's way. Then, when it comes out great, which it eventually will, you will know the difference.

--WRITE as much as you want: Winnowing down is so much easier than filling in later.

--DON'T hesitate to ask a professional: Some things just beg for help. If you find yourself endlessly circling a dead pigeon, really...aren't there other things you'd rather do and still get that statement written?

Ariane Goodwin helps artists take their careers to the next level, so they can make an honest living doing what they love. Besides art-career coaching and my seminal book, Writing the Artist Statement: Revealing the True Spirit of Your Work I also host the annual smARTist Telesummit , the only professional art-career conference online or off that helps you build your art career from the comforts of home You can also sign up for your weekly smARTips to advance your career one tip at a time.

How To Write An Artist Statement

July21

By Molly Gordon

Your artist's statement can be a moving testament to your creativity and integrity. The expression of this commitment will vary, but the effectiveness of your artist's statement stems from the authority with which you write it.

Think of your artist's statement as a nourishing stew. The rich flavors and inviting aroma will feed your spirit and summon wonderful people to your table. You'll want to make sure your stew is made from the freshest, finest ingredients and that it has been simmered and seasoned with care. Do this, and you will be proud to share your creative vision -- your authority -- with others.

WRITING YOUR ARTIST'S STATEMENT

STEP ONE: Assemble the Ingredients.

1. Take five minutes and think about why you do what you do. How did you get into this work? How do you feel when work is going well? What are your favorite things about your work? Jot down short phrases that capture your thoughts. Don't worry about making sense or connections. The more you stir up at this point, the richer the stew.

2. Make a list of words and phrases that communicate your feelings about your work and your values. Include words you like, words that make you feel good, words that communicate your values or fascinations. Be loose. Be happy. Be real. Think of these as potential seasonings for your stew. You don't have to choose which ones to use just yet, so get them all out of the cupboard.

3. Answer these questions as simply as you can. Your answers are the meat and potatoes of your stew. Let them be raw and uncut for now.

What is your favorite tool? Why?

What is your favorite material? Why?

What do you like best about what you do?

What do you mean when you say that a piece has turned out really well?

What patterns emerge in your work? Is there a pattern in the way you select materials? In the way you use color, texture or light?

What do you do differently from the way you were taught? Why?

What is your favorite color? List three qualities of the color. Consider that these qualities apply to your work.

4. Look at your word list. Add new words suggested by your answers to the questions above.

5. Choose two key words from your word list. They can be related or entirely different. Look them up in a dictionary. Read all the definitions listed for your words. Copy the definitions, thinking about what notions they have in common. Look your words up in a Thesaurus. Read the entries related to your words. Are there any new words that should be added to your word list?

6. Write five sentences that tell the truth about your connection to your work. If you are stuck, start by filling in the blanks below.

When I work with__________ I am reminded that___________.

I begin a piece by______________.

I know a piece is done when__________________.

When my work is going well, I am filled with a sense of _____________.

When people see my work, I'd like them to ________________.

STEP TWO: Filling the Pot.

Write a three paragraph artist's statement. Keep your sentences authentic and direct. Use the present tense ("I am," not "I was," "I do," not "I did.") Be brave: say nice things about yourself. If you find that you falter, write three paragraphs about an artist whose work you admire. Then write about yourself as though you were an admiring colleague. As a rule, your artist's statement should be written in the first person. Refer to yourself with the pronouns "I, me, my." If this blocks you, write in the third person, then go back and change the pronouns as needed when you get to Step Four. Use the suggestions below to structure your statement. Write three to five sentences per paragraph.

First paragraph. Begin with a simple statement of why you do the work you do. Support that statement, telling the reader more about your goals and aspirations.

Second paragraph. Tell the reader how you make decisions in the course of your work. How and why do you select materials, techniques, themes? Keep it simple and tell the truth.

Third paragraph. Tell the reader a little more about your current work. How it is grew out of prior work or life experiences. What are you exploring, attempting, challenging by doing this work.

STEP THREE: Simmering the Stew.

Your artist's statement is a piece of very personal writing. Let it simmer overnight before your reread it. This incubation period will help give you the detachment necessary to polish the writing without violating your sense of integrity and safety. While your statement simmers, let your mind wander over the ingredients you assembled in Step One. Allow yourself to experience the truth of your creative experience. Marvel at the wealth of seasonings and abundance of vegetables you have at your disposal. Enjoy the realization that your work is grounded in real values and experience. If you think of things you might have left out of your statement, jot them down, but leave the statement alone.

STEP FOUR: Taste and Correct the Seasonings.

Read your statement aloud. Listen to the way the sounds and rhythms seem to invite pauses. Notice places where you'd like the sound or rhythm to be different. Experiment with sounding out the beats of words that seem to be missing until they come to mind. Do this several times until you have a sense of the musical potential of your statement. As you read your statement, some phrases will ring true and others false. Think about the ones that aren't on the mark and find the true statement lurking behind the false one. You may find that the truth is a simpler statement than the one you made. Or your internal censors may have kept you from making a wholehearted statement of your truth lest it sound self-important. Risk puffing yourself up as long as your claims are in line with your goals and values.

By now your taste buds are saturated. You need a second opinion. Choose a trusted friend or professional to read your statement. Make it clear that you are satisfied with the ingredients on the whole, but you'd like an opinion as to seasoning. You alone are the authority for what is true about your work, but you'd like feedback on clarity, tone, and such technical matters as spelling and punctuation.

STEP FIVE: Summon the Guests.

There's little point in concocting a fabulous stew if you don't invite anyone to dinner. Every time you use your artist's statement you extend your circle of influence and build new branches of the support network for making, showing and selling your work. Enclose a copy of your artist's statement whenever you send a press release, letter of interest to a gallery or store, or contact a collector. Send it to show promoters and curators. Enclose a copy with shipments of your work so it can be displayed wherever your work is exhibited.

STEP SIX: File Your Recipe!

Save all the notes and drafts that you've made. You'll want to revise and update your artist's statement from time to time to reflect changes in your work.

Molly shows accidental entrepreneurs how to make a profit without losing their minds. Molly Gordon , MCC, is an internationally recognized business coach helping small business owners, independent professionals and artists to do business in a way that feeds their souls as well as their bank accounts. Visit her site to learn how to write a compelling artist statement in six easy steps. While on the site, don't forget to join 12,000 readers of Molly's Authentic Promotion® ezine, and receive a free 31-page guide on effective self promotion . Join one of Molly's free special interest groups to receive periodic emails about resources for related to your needs including invitations to both free and fee-based programs including teleconferences, tools, and special reports.

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The Artist’s Statement: A Marketing Tool Every Artist Needs

July21
By  Suzanne Lieurance

If you're an artist or craftsperson offering your art in stores and galleries, you need an artist's statement. Do you have one? If not, you're missing out on a great marketing tool.

Artist's statements vary in length, form, and the material presented. Generally, though, an artist's statement should let readers know a bit about your background, include a few sentences about what you believe to be the most important aspects of your art, and describe the techniques, materials, and tools you use to create it.

Here are just a few ways your artist's statement can be used to promote your art:

1. It can help art consultants, gallery owners, and store salespeople better understand your work. The more they know about what you do, the better they are able to sell your work.

2. It helps reviewers, biographers, and reporters write reviews, profiles, and articles about you. They don't need to call you or meet with you for an interview. They simply use material from your statement, and other information from the store or gallery owner, to craft an announcement or review of your work for their newspaper or other publication.

3. It can be used to submit with grant applications and project proposals. Since your artist's statement offers a short explanation of your work and the techniques you use, it is a good summary piece to include with slides, photos, or other samples of your work when applying for funding.

4. It can encourage viewers to purchase your work because they may feel a deeper connection to your art after reading about it (and you) in your artist's statement.

If you've put off writing your own artist's statement because you've found it difficult to "toot your own horn," so to speak, then hire a professional writer to write your statement for you. Your artist's statement will become one of the most valuable marketing tools you'll use to promote your art.

Suzanne Lieurance is a children's author, freelance writer, and owner of the Three Angels Gourmet Co. Find out more about her children's books at http://www.suzannelieurance.com or get information about her freelance writing services (including artist's statements) at http://www.lieurancegroup.blogspot.com Her line of "heavenly gourmet mixes" is available online at http://www.threeangelsgourmet.com
Source: http://www.pacificarticles.com/articles/102/1/The-Artists-Statement-A-Marketing-Tool-Every-Artist-Needs/The-Artists-Statement-A-Marketing-Tool-Every-Artist-Needs.html

Artist Statements Do’s and Don’ts

July21
By Alyson Stanfield

An artist statement is a necessary component of any professional artists' portfolio or promotional packet.

When writing your artist statement, DO:

* Write in the first person. It is a statement, after all.

* Be brief, 2-3 paragraphs at most. Always err on the side of brevity. You can write more, but why would you want to? People have short attention spans these days. Load as much punch into the delivery as you can. Combine sentences and delete ones that aren't vital. As Henri Matisse said in his treatise on painting, "All that is not useful to the picture is detrimental." The same could be said of your statement.

* Describe the current direction of your work and your approach, particularly what is unique about your methods and materials.

* Sit on it for a few days and come back to it with a fresh mindset. Most artists, in my opinion, hate their statements because they rushed them in preparation for an exhibit and didn't care to spend any more time on them. How do you expect it to be any good if you don't work at it?

* Consider more than one statement if you are trying to discuss more than one body of work. If you try to get too much into a single statement, you run the risk of saying nothing and trying to be everything to all people. This is bad marketing/bad promotions.

* Allow your artist statement to grow, change, and mature along with your work. Don't let it sit on a shelf and collect dust. It should be organic and you shouldn't be afraid to change it and make it better.

* Make sure your statement passes the litmus test. Above all, viewers should be compelled to put the statement away and look back at the work. Your statement isn't successful if people read the words on the page, and then put them down and go on to the next artist.

When writing your artist statement, DO NOT:

* Use too many personal pronouns. Yes, I said to write in first person, but try to severely limit the number of "I"s, "me"s and "my"s that are used. You'll be amazed at how many other ways there are to phrase things. You want people to relate to your words and to your art. Too many personal pronouns will put up an unnecessary a barrier.

* Tell your life story. You can keep that for your bio (as long as it's interesting). Your artist statement is only about the current direction of your work.

* Quote or refer to anyone else by name. Keep the focus on you and your art. Mentioning another name shifts the readers' attention from your art to the other person.

* Forget to use spell check and ask someone else to read it over for you.

View the time to write your artist statement as an opportunity to clarify your thoughts. A well-written statement, approached deliberately and thoughtfully, can be a boon to your self-promotion efforts. You'll use the language on your Web site and in grant applications, press releases, brochures, and much more.

Copyright 2008 Alyson Stanfield, All rights reserved.

Alyson B. Stanfield is an art-marketing consultant, artist advocate, and author of I'd Rather Be in the Studio! The Artist's No-Excuse Guide to Self-Promotion. Sign up for her free Art Marketing Action newsletter at

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Artist Statement Resources

July21

By Sarah Schmerler

Author: Peter Elbow; Title: "Writing Without Teachers" by far, the best book I've found to advise artists on how to write.

Author: David Bayles; Title: Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils of Artmaking - inspiration and encouragement.

I've taught Writing for Artists for many years at The New School, and that Elbow book (until I write my own book!) is the only one I know that can start an artist off with the right attitude. What does Elbow say?: That you can't know what you're going to write until you begin writing. Writing, my artist friends, is a Process - no different than painting or printmaking or sculpting. Over-think it, over "outline" it, and you'll kill your own creativity. No one wants to read something cliched or boring or dry.

My advice: Don't make your artist statement sound like a "statement." Make it sound like you.

Stay away from telling us what your work is about.' Tell us about' yourself, and what you do. Just start with that, and be honest. Your reader will figure out the rest - and will be grateful to you for letting them make their own conclusions.

Here's my do's and don't list from recent workshops. It's better when internalized, over time. But for those who want a quick fix, here you go:

workshops, '09, statement do's and don'ts List

If you want me to edit or re-write your statement, you can contact me here .

About Sarah Schmerler
I've been an art critic and journalist in New York City for 12 years. My writing has appeared in newspapers like The New York Post and The New York Times, weekly magazines like TimeOut New York and The Village Voice, and monthly and bi-monthly publications like Art in America, ArtNews, Photograph, Art & Auction, and Art on Paper.

I've taught writing at The New School, and art history at Pratt Institute's School of Professional Studies and Medgar Evers College, CUNY, Brooklyn.

I've developed a writing methodology specifically geared toward visual artists. I help artists write great statements about their own and others' work.

And I've run an artist-writer collaborative called CoLAB since 2007. (You can read about our exploits soon.)

Sarah Schmerler.com

Artist Statements, Artist Biography Tips, And Resumes – Nuts and Bolts

July21
Nuts and Bolts

By Barbara Bowen

 "If you aim for a market you'll miss the mark." Whoever said that, I'm a believer. It's no good looking over the shoulder at what strangers prefer before creating. True inspiration is the optimal motivator. Quality issues from there, and its purity taps the nerves of audience attraction. That said, there are far too many masterpieces tucked on shelves behind the light of day. Strong promotional tools may be secondary to our motivation, but they're essential. Like the apex of an iceberg, they show first. They introduce our work, foster credibility, and mirror how far we've traveled along the arc of our goals. Those we know may direct us to new connections. But even then, we must support those connections with an effective "portrait" of who we are. Selling is a part of every career. Never underestimate the power of presentation. Why not enter the new season prepared with an updated, incisive, authentic, and powerful one? What do you need? A dynamic artist statement, artist biography and artist resume is the beginning. Effective artist portfolios and proposals are also important. Start now and stay ahead of the pack. So, what are the important elements of these essential artist presentation tools?

Artist Statement: Shaping your essential bond with viewers and sales An artist statement communicates what motivates you as an artist. It's the most personal part of your presentation; an opportunity to bring your viewers and potential buyers closer. It offers a glimpse of the person behind the work. While keeping it informative, let your personality show. Share your ideas and concerns, and how they are revealed in your work. Explain to viewers what your work means to you, not what it's supposed to mean to them. They will arrive at their own conclusions. It's okay to mention influences, but mostly keep prominent names associated with your career for your resume, where they will serve as testimonial and avoid the appearance of boasting. Give some details about your techniques and how they help you achieve your vision. Then, you might add a segment about how your approach is unique. Most general artist statements are around one page or less. Brevity sustains attention, so I lean toward three or four concise paragraphs. In some situations, a statement about a particular artwork may be requested. A statement can act as a marketing piece in certain commercial situations, which may be appropriate. So be sure to tailor your artist statement to its purpose.

Artist Biography: Creating a memorable snapshot of your career life An artist bio contains similar information to the artist resume but is presented in paragraph form, is less formal, and is most often written in the third person. It serves to highlight the information presented on your resume. It's a great way to convey a "snapshot" of your career experience.

Artist Resume: Detailing your career with clarity and professionalism Artist resumes detail the accomplishments, endeavors, and knowledge. They offer a full picture of your career, and the categories featured on the resume will depend upon your artistic discipline. It's important to update your resume on a regular basis, adding and deleting the listed activities, as appropriate. An artist resume can be one to four pages in length. Most artists have two versions prepared: a longer and shorter version. It's often best to use a professional paper stock, in white or ivory. The style of type varies, and can add to the resume's professionalism.

Artist Proposal: Standing out from the crowd with dynamic writing/shaping/editing Artists also use their portfolio to apply for specific projects, funding programs, residencies, or other competitive opportunities. These applications may ask you to submit a project description, details on your approach to the project, and a cover letter. These written materials should be tightly edited and tailored to the particular opportunity. Be passionate and sincere in the presentation of your work, and always conclude with thanking the panel, juror, and/or organization for their time and consideration. Typical questions for you to answer will be: Why are you an ideal applicant? How will you benefit the program or project? What technical qualifications, abilities, or personal assets can you contribute? How will you benefit from the opportunity? How would the project advance your career as an artist? How would you use the money awarded?

Visual Artist Portfolio: Keeping the heart and soul of your work evolving Your portfolio is the most valuable tool in your overall presentation. Your visuals are worth a thousand words, and an arresting portfolio can help close the gap, should your written materials be less developed, as in young artist on the career path. There are many approaches to a portfolio, depending upon the discipline. One universal ingredient to a successful portfolio is a sense of continuity. The transitions between and within subject matter must cohere. Color, tone, shape, scale, all must be considered when choosing what images to include and how to position them. This process involves subjectivity as well as objectivity. Most artists benefit greatly from feedback from a trained eye, and reactions from untrained eyes can also be helpful. A portfolio is most successful when modified and tailored, with acumen, for its particular audience. Many artists now supplement their physical portfolio with a digital version either on the Web or presented on CD-ROM or DVD. Stay current on new formats and choose the method(s) that feature your work most powerfully and support your marketing goals.

*Article by Barbara Bowen, founder of: http://www.GatewaysCoaching.com #NAME? for Creativity Coaching and http://www.GatewaysToAction.blogspot.com

Email Barbara your questions about creativity coaching and creating dynamic artist statements, bios, resumes and proposals. Learn about creative action projects through her Web sites. She would love to hear from you.*

Do you need content? You may use this article on your website, or in your newsletter. The only requirement is inclusion of the text above, including the active links. Thank you.

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An Artist’s Statement

July21
Author: Jo Mari Montesa

Of all the gifts God gave to man the finest is his free will. Second to life itself. It is the essence of man. It is what separates man from all the other creatures of God. By ones choice or action he is judged if he is worthy to be called the man created by God.

The child of free will is art. It is man's self-expression. It is synonymous to freedom of expression. Every art is unique since every man is unique. How man perceives art is also unique as how man perceives beauty. As how man perceive life.

Art is like life. It all depends to the person's perception. Truly beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder. The gauge of how beautiful life is, depends uniquely to every man.

A professor of mine once walked in the streets of Manila during summer. It is very hot, humid and dusty. He noticed a very old beggar asking for coins to the passers while bathing to the heat of the sun all day. Beside the beggar was a newspaper stand. One tabloid headline reads 'Young Matinee Idol Commits Suicide." My professor stops for awhile and asks himself how could this young man kill himself when he has everything. Money, women, good looks, popularity, youthfulness, what more could he ask for. While this old beggar is still striving for a few coins. Why not just threw himself to the vehicles speeding in front of him. Like my professor, my conclusion too is that it's all a matter of perception.

Like life the beauty of art depends solely to the individual. It is how man perceives art that makes it beautiful.

Those who believe that they found the beauty in life. Let as show that beauty to the world. Let as show our art.

About the Author:

Jose Mari Montesa or Jo Mari is a Visual Artist by talent. He has Masters Degree in Business Administration, Accountancy is his profession and currently working in a bank. But his heart really belongs to the Art world.

Since his boyhood he joined many art contests in different mediums. He has informal trainings in Painting, Technical Drawing and Photography. Also, a student and a believer of Humanities.

Jo Mari is also into Photography. He joined competitions both local and international. Some of his Photographic works are now in the hands of private collectors.

Right now the artist is concentrated in painting. Specifically Oil painting on canvas. He hopes that he will be known for this medium.

Most of his paintings are influenced by the rich culture and tradition in the Philippines. For example his series of Immaculate Concepcion oil paintings are inspired by the dark wood used in the icons of the Virgin Mary centuries ago when Spain brought Christianity to the Philippines. This type of wood are used to make the skin complexion of the Virgin similar to Asian or a Filipina.

Jo Mari have also done Landscapes, Still Life and Abstract paintings.

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Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - An Artist's Statement

Guidelines on Writing a Good Artist Statement and Resume

July21
By Reinaldo Arvelo
 
 
 

Your art work should always be accompanied by an artist statement and resume if you are going to submit your work to a gallery. Your statement should be your defense and your voice. Your resume should be a brief collection of experiences, exposure, organizations, commissions, publications, or lectures. The importance of having both an artist statement and resume is essential for all beginning artists.

Your Artist Statement:

For your statement try not to be vague. Always explain "why" you say what you say. As an artist, I focus on three important details in my statement. Your influence, Your Process, and Your Intention. When writing about your art it is best to describe what your influences are. For example, if nature is your motivation than explain what are the influences that nature provides you. Your influences can be spiritual just as long as you explain why and what they are and how they influence you.

The way you execute your work is also an important topic in your statement. Your process should reflect with your influences. Do not confuse your work habit with your process. Focus on the evolution of the work itself. Why do you use that color? Why is it shaped that way? Keep in mind that your materials also play a big part in your statement. Even the surface you work on can play a big important aesthetic meaning or quality to your artwork.

Lastly, on writing a good artist statement, you should explain your intention. Give your defense on what you are trying to tell people about your work. Is you work to explain, stimulate, poke fun of, inform, or an opinion or maybe a belief. No matter what the intent it should represent you and your work. I usually end my statement with the intention because it answers the "why" process and the "what" influences that support it.

Your Artist Resume:

Your artist resume is simply a listing of your artistic career and experience. Even if you do not have much experience you can still be able put together a good resume. Start by writing down gallery shows you have been in and keep group shows and solo shows apart. What commissions, projects or art work you have sold? List any periodicals you have been in like magazines, books, and articles. Any organizations, clubs, or memberships you are a part of. Make sure to provide your information like an address, email and phone number to contact you. Also add your education. Below is a simple setup on how to put together your resume:

Name
Address
Phone
Email
website

Education

Solo Shows

Year, title of show, name of gallery, city and sate

Group Shows

Year, title of show, name of gallery, city and state

Commission / Projects

title of commission or project, who commissioned it, city and state

Awards

Articles

year, publication, title

Clubs and Organizations

Employment (optional)

Make sure you keep your statement and resume up to date.

http://www.artistneed.com is new site made for artists. With useful information, resources, tutorials, software, and books. Email them to be placed on their monthly newsletter.

Reinaldo Arvelo
You can also visit Arvelo's website at http://www.reinaldoarvelo.com

Artist Statements, Artist Biography Tips, And Resumes – Nuts and Bolts

July21

Artist Statements, Artist Biography Tips, And Resumes - Nuts and Bolts

By Barbara Bowen

 "If you aim for a market you'll miss the mark." Whoever said that, I'm a believer. It's no good looking over the shoulder at what strangers prefer before creating. True inspiration is the optimal motivator. Quality issues from there, and its purity taps the nerves of audience attraction. That said, there are far too many masterpieces tucked on shelves behind the light of day. Strong promotional tools may be secondary to our motivation, but they're essential. Like the apex of an iceberg, they show first. They introduce our work, foster credibility, and mirror how far we've traveled along the arc of our goals. Those we know may direct us to new connections. But even then, we must support those connections with an effective "portrait" of who we are. Selling is a part of every career. Never underestimate the power of presentation. Why not enter the new season prepared with an updated, incisive, authentic, and powerful one? What do you need? A dynamic artist statement, artist biography and artist resume is the beginning. Effective artist portfolios and proposals are also important. Start now and stay ahead of the pack. So, what are the important elements of these essential artist presentation tools?

Artist Statement: Shaping your essential bond with viewers and sales An artist statement communicates what motivates you as an artist. It's the most personal part of your presentation; an opportunity to bring your viewers and potential buyers closer. It offers a glimpse of the person behind the work. While keeping it informative, let your personality show. Share your ideas and concerns, and how they are revealed in your work. Explain to viewers what your work means to you, not what it's supposed to mean to them. They will arrive at their own conclusions. It's okay to mention influences, but mostly keep prominent names associated with your career for your resume, where they will serve as testimonial and avoid the appearance of boasting. Give some details about your techniques and how they help you achieve your vision. Then, you might add a segment about how your approach is unique. Most general artist statements are around one page or less. Brevity sustains attention, so I lean toward three or four concise paragraphs. In some situations, a statement about a particular artwork may be requested. A statement can act as a marketing piece in certain commercial situations, which may be appropriate. So be sure to tailor your artist statement to its purpose.

Artist Biography: Creating a memorable snapshot of your career life An artist bio contains similar information to the artist resume but is presented in paragraph form, is less formal, and is most often written in the third person. It serves to highlight the information presented on your resume. It's a great way to convey a "snapshot" of your career experience.

Artist Resume: Detailing your career with clarity and professionalism Artist resumes detail the accomplishments, endeavors, and knowledge. They offer a full picture of your career, and the categories featured on the resume will depend upon your artistic discipline. It's important to update your resume on a regular basis, adding and deleting the listed activities, as appropriate. An artist resume can be one to four pages in length. Most artists have two versions prepared: a longer and shorter version. It's often best to use a professional paper stock, in white or ivory. The style of type varies, and can add to the resume's professionalism.

Artist Proposal: Standing out from the crowd with dynamic writing/shaping/editing Artists also use their portfolio to apply for specific projects, funding programs, residencies, or other competitive opportunities. These applications may ask you to submit a project description, details on your approach to the project, and a cover letter. These written materials should be tightly edited and tailored to the particular opportunity. Be passionate and sincere in the presentation of your work, and always conclude with thanking the panel, juror, and/or organization for their time and consideration. Typical questions for you to answer will be: Why are you an ideal applicant? How will you benefit the program or project? What technical qualifications, abilities, or personal assets can you contribute? How will you benefit from the opportunity? How would the project advance your career as an artist? How would you use the money awarded?

Visual Artist Portfolio: Keeping the heart and soul of your work evolving Your portfolio is the most valuable tool in your overall presentation. Your visuals are worth a thousand words, and an arresting portfolio can help close the gap, should your written materials be less developed, as in young artist on the career path. There are many approaches to a portfolio, depending upon the discipline. One universal ingredient to a successful portfolio is a sense of continuity. The transitions between and within subject matter must cohere. Color, tone, shape, scale, all must be considered when choosing what images to include and how to position them. This process involves subjectivity as well as objectivity. Most artists benefit greatly from feedback from a trained eye, and reactions from untrained eyes can also be helpful. A portfolio is most successful when modified and tailored, with acumen, for its particular audience. Many artists now supplement their physical portfolio with a digital version either on the Web or presented on CD-ROM or DVD. Stay current on new formats and choose the method(s) that feature your work most powerfully and support your marketing goals.

*Article by Barbara Bowen, founder of: http://www.GatewaysCoaching.com - - the definitive source for Creativity Coaching and http://www.GatewaysToAction.blogspot.com

Email Barbara your questions about creativity coaching and creating dynamic artist statements, bios, resumes and proposals. Learn about creative action projects through her Web sites. She would love to hear from you.*

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